The largest community of 1978-1988 General Motors G-Body cars. Chevrolet Malibu, El Camino, Monte Carlo; Oldsmobile Cutlass, 442, Hurst/Olds; Buick Regal, Century, T-Type, Grand National; Pontiac Grand Am, Grand Prix, LeMans, Bonneville; GMC Caballero
Get the GBodyForum e-mail newsletter!, Contests, Events, Deals, Forum News and More!
It appears you're not logged in! Not a member? Registration's FREE and only takes a minute!
Register now or Log in to hide this ad block.
GBodyForum Supporting Vendor

Help with Pivot Pin/Broken Bolt Removal ***Pictures added***

Eventually the goal is to have a repository of G-Body knowledge... eventually!
User avatar
blizack
Master Mechanic
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Toronto, On, Canada

Help with Pivot Pin/Broken Bolt Removal ***Pictures added***

Postby blizack on Fri Aug 28, 2009 5:51 pm

I need to find a way to remove a metal bolt that broke off inside of my tilt steering pivot pin.

I've tried drilling and heating the metal with a torch and then drilling but that hasn't given much yield either.

Would air tools be stronger than an electric drill? Are there any chemical methods or techniques that I could try?

This really is an emergency as I'm running out of time to get this done. Thanks in advance to you all.

**Update: These are pictures I just took today:

This is my self-made pivot pin puller with the pin attached. I've used this to take out one of the two pins. You can get an idea of how it works -
Image

This is the good pivot pin after removal. Note the threads on the inside-
Image

now this is the pivot pin still in the steering column. This one has about 1\4 of an inch of depth that I've been able to drill into.

Image

[img]http://i653.photobucket.com/albums/uu258/blizack/PIC_0002-
4.jpg[/img]

Now my plan is to have the pivot pin puller that I made welded into the pivot pin, and then use that to pull it out. My neighbor with his welder says that its probably not a good idea. What do you guys think?

Basically it would look like this but welded:
Image
Last edited by blizack on Mon Aug 31, 2009 5:53 pm, edited 5 times in total.

User avatar
blizack
Master Mechanic
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Toronto, On, Canada

Postby blizack on Fri Aug 28, 2009 6:46 pm

anyone have one of these to lend me?

http://www.kleinindustrialservices.com/broken-bolt-removal.php

you know, just layin around in your garage

User avatar
username
G Body Guru
 
Posts: 364
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 7:05 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby username on Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:10 pm

Well if you were in TN I could help you out but in the mean time you should be able to get an easyout from a tool store or you can by them individually off of a snap-on truck for like three bucks.I imagine its broke flush with the surface your best bet at this point is stop drilling the remaining material of the bolt until you get an extractor that way you know what size drill bit to use.

User avatar
blizack
Master Mechanic
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Toronto, On, Canada

Postby blizack on Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:14 pm

I forgot to mention that it is a screw extractor that broke off inside of the pivot pin. The threads didn't hold up very well and kind of lodged the bit inside of it. It is too tightly stuck to maneuver out and I've already tried drilling.

I was just reading that "the harder the metal, the slower the turning speed [of the drill]." Does this hold any truth? Should I really try drilling into this piece of hardened steel while operating the drill on slow speeds?

User avatar
Minion1186
Royal Smart Person
 
Posts: 1305
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 6:01 pm

Postby Minion1186 on Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:20 pm

I used a drill when one of my exhaust bolts(actually four) broke off.

User avatar
username
G Body Guru
 
Posts: 364
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 7:05 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby username on Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:37 pm

Yes the harder the material the slower you want to turn the bit, if you can find a fluted bit they work alot better than a standard bit.You need to dimple with a center punch and step up the drilling starting smaller as to give yourself a pilot.It sucks but I even had to resort to a pencil grinder to remove extractors that broke while using them :x

User avatar
xitabl442
G Body Guru
 
Posts: 332
Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 2:43 pm
Location: Saint Henry, Ohio

Postby xitabl442 on Fri Aug 28, 2009 8:08 pm

I heard if you heat it and push a candle into it the wax will melt into the threads to lubricate the threads. The guy that told me that said he did it on an engine block, so he was able to apply a lot of heat.
How big is the bolt? I have welded a nut over the top of a broken bolt and used a socket on the nut to back them out.
Live your life like an exclamation, not an explanation.

1986 Olds 442, 350 TPI from an '89 Vette. Original 200R4 back in, Aftermarket harness/computer chip, mid-length headers, custom 2.5 exhaust w/ x-pipe and side exit. Eibach springs all around, SC&C Stage 2+ front suspension, boxed rear suspension arms. Custom painted Coys C-67 wheels 17x8 fr, 17x9 rr.
59k miles, second owner.
Disassembled for paint.

User avatar
blizack
Master Mechanic
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Toronto, On, Canada

Postby blizack on Fri Aug 28, 2009 8:19 pm

Another thing guys, the threads of the pivot pin were soft so they mended in with the threads on the pivot pin puller. So basically, I'm pretty sure I'm going to have to use some force on this thing. Thanks guys.


User avatar
billyjack
G Body Guru
 
Posts: 470
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 6:50 am
Location: Western PA

Postby billyjack on Fri Aug 28, 2009 11:01 pm

Why don't you buy a left-handed drill bit or two? If you need to do some drilling, at least have the drilling direction working for you rather than against you.

Bill

Next

Return to How-To's / Knowledge Base

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users