Anyone run wood heat in their shop/home?

marcar1993

marcar1993

G-Body Guru
Aug 31, 2007
682
43
New Jersey
I was given a big old Nashua stove for my garage. I am looking forward to having heat and indoor workspace this winter, but looking into the process of building a chimney seems a bit back and forth as to what is actually needed.

I have an 8' cinderblock wall, then the roof and end walls beneath the roof are wood. I plan to run the chimney up and out the wood wall where there is already a framed opening (originally a vent). I figured I would run black stove pipe up to the wall, concrete board mounted on spacers in front of the wood wall where it passes by, and then the real question is through the wall and out. There seems to be a mixed discussion on legal/safe options. I need to pass through a wood wall then turn up and go about 6' to be 2-3' above the rooftop.
How would you suggest to do it, for those of you that have done it? I would rather not cut holes in the roof if I can help it.


 
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ck80

G-Body Guru
Feb 18, 2014
846
93
Metalbestos pipe is your friend.

1st thing to do is get a flat piece of sheet metal and some 1-2 inch or so spacers. Install the metal veritcally, maybe 4'x6' sheet behind the woodstove to make a heat sheild behind the stove. Cinder block and old concrete/mortar is likely to crack from the woodstove.

Normally I'd put a layer of pavers down underneath the stove and about 12 in from any edge as well to protect the floor. Again, old concrete may crack from that heat.

You can use plain mild steel black stove pipe up until maybe 18" from the wood, then use the metalbestos type - it has built in heat shield.

Outside you'll want to continue that metalbestos until the top, go at least 18" above the peak of the roof, then put a chimney cap on top to keep water out.

You'll use less pipe, save a bunch of money, and have a better draft going straight up through the roof, but, the longer the straight section after making the 2 90* bends to go through the wall at any rate the better.

Downside to the bends is depending what you burn, and how hot, those bends are a build point for creasote (fire hazard) and place if you do need to sweep the pipe will have chunks accumulate.
 
wonderboy24

wonderboy24

Royal Smart Person
Jul 10, 2012
1,269
113
Davenport, Iowa
i had wood burner.how mine was piped it had double wall from the furnace. through the wall then to the out side i had a tee the from the top of the tee about a foot above the garage roof. bottom of the tee was open.i had a inline damper in the inside piping.need less to say i dont have it anymore.was givin a 6 month old 135 thousand btu garage furnace.still have to run gas from the house to the garage.
 
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pontiacgp

pontiacgp

Canadian Prime Minister
Mar 31, 2006
26,160
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Kitchener, Ontario
If you are not planing on insulating the cinder block walls I would do something at the back of the stove to deflect the heat away from the wall. Cinder block will absorb the heat so all the heat from the back of the stove is wasted
 
marcar1993

marcar1993

G-Body Guru
Aug 31, 2007
682
43
New Jersey
That's what I was afraid of. The through the wall T kit alone is over $300! I'm looking at $5-600 for a simple 6 feet vertical and 2 feet horizontal of chimney! The entire inside is going to be maybe $100. Ouch.
 
fleming442

fleming442

Geezer
Dec 26, 2013
8,041
113
It looks like a rear exit flue on the stove, no? IMO, the right way to do it would be a thimble straight back through the wall to a triple insulated stainless flue outside. I don't know what's going on behind the wall, though (grade, clearance, etc...).
 
79 USA 1

79 USA 1

G-Body Guru
Sep 2, 2011
503
93
Cheektowaga, New York
Before going to far check with your local municipality on having a wood burner in a garage. Years back I acquired a wood stove from a co worker who remodeled his home. To install it I needed a permit from the town I live in and was informed that it would be in violation of fire code due to the possibility of the open flame and storage of gasoline in the structure. Ironically natural gas, propane, hot water boilers seem to be allowed as long as they are in a contained "heater room". Suspended heaters are allowed but no wood burners.
 
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Tomeal

Tomeal

Greasemonkey
Apr 17, 2016
200
63
Clyde,pa
Before going to far check with your local municipality on having a wood burner in a garage. Years back I acquired a wood stove from a co worker who remodeled his home. To install it I needed a permit from the town I live in and was informed that it would be in violation of fire code due to the possibility of the open flame and storage of gasoline in the structure. Ironically natural gas, propane, hot water boilers seem to be allowed as long as they are in a contained "heater room". Suspended heaters are allowed but no wood burners.
Some home insurance policies do not allow heating devices on a garage floor either.
 
Streetbu

Streetbu

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
May 22, 2011
1,292
113
Central NY
Check C-list, you can usually find used insulated pipe for 1/3 price of new...
 
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C

ck80

G-Body Guru
Feb 18, 2014
846
93
That's what I was afraid of. The through the wall T kit alone is over $300! I'm looking at $5-600 for a simple 6 feet vertical and 2 feet horizontal of chimney! The entire inside is going to be maybe $100. Ouch.
Before going to far check with your local municipality on having a wood burner in a garage. Years back I acquired a wood stove from a co worker who remodeled his home. To install it I needed a permit from the town I live in and was informed that it would be in violation of fire code due to the possibility of the open flame and storage of gasoline in the structure. Ironically natural gas, propane, hot water boilers seem to be allowed as long as they are in a contained "heater room". Suspended heaters are allowed but no wood burners.
Some home insurance policies do not allow heating devices on a garage floor either.
How about going outside the box. A Lil hilltown redneck ingenuity from where I grew up.

Build a small lean-to/salt box styled shed extension on the outside of the back of that block wall. Use metal roofing, steel studs, same metal roofing on walls like a steel butler building does.

Drill a couple small 1" holes in the block wall. Run pipe through em, and put some cast-off cast iron radiators being junked, offer just enough above scrap price to make it worthwhile for a scrapper to deliver.

Put 2 or 3 strategically around the garage.

Outside, you turn that woodstove into a glorified water heater with a mix of tank and tubing encompassing it providing the hot water/steam for the radiators.

Because heat comes from multiple sources, heat-up time inside the shop is a breeze. Take bout the same time to get the steam up and going than just heating the cast up to temp as well. Insulate the Lil shed and freezing up won't be a concern long as you run it every so often, maybe a nice hard low-sulfur coal works better than wood.

Cost of shed offset by not needing any insulated pipe.
 
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