Best 1/4 Drag predictor tool

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Myles

Myles

Apprentice
Jun 17, 2011
74
8
Hi everyone,

Looking for the Best 1/4 Drag predictor tool.

Theres many online but looking for one that takes into account valvetrain, rockers, cam duration, lobe, fuel ratios, etc.

Iv heard of high end programs (that aren't cheap) but dont know the names.

Can anyone point me in the right direction? Any experience with this?

Thank you
 
fleming442

fleming442

Geezer
Dec 26, 2013
8,880
113
The factors you list are variables in the engine which is a partial factor in 1/4mi. ET. I've never heard of a program with that much detail. Now, if use something like Desktop Dyno or Pipemax, you can input the engine power as a figure in the ET calculation. IMO, it would be easier to target a goal (weight, MPH, ET, HP, etc.) first, then build to that with an engine simulator. I.E.- want to go [email protected] requires X hp.....
 
TURNA

TURNA

Rocket Powered Basset Hound
Jul 24, 2009
10,040
113
Socialist NY
Buy a stop watch and a flash light, get a friend go find a straight flat 1/2 mile long road

You can build a 9 second car no problem.. If your reaction time suxx it was a waste of $$$$
 
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bracketchev1221

G-Body Guru
Jan 18, 2018
555
93
Not sure what you are really looking for. ET predictors, are only as good as the info you put into it. So if you don't know the crankshaft power and rpms, its all guesses after that. And then even with the HP and rpm from the dyno, it can't tell what the parasitic loss through the drivetrain is. My car was very inefficient as a drag car. I made a lot of power, but couldn't put the money into the chassis setup to try to put every HP from the engine to the tire. So the car didn't have the ET to HP ratio of say like an NHRA Super Stocker.
 
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lilbowtie

lilbowtie

Comic Book Super Hero
Jan 7, 2006
2,838
113
Canton Mi
1/4 mi. predictors are simple - it's the weight your car (w/ driver) and how much HP your putting down. The not so simple thing is getting everything to complement each other. How much Hp are you putting out and what RPM are you making this power at. This will all be determined by the engine, how much compression, size, the cam will determine RPM range, the heads (w/intake) have to complement engine size and RPM range, and of course fuel to match. As mentioned the Desktop dyno is a great aid. Once you determine HP and RPM the rest of the drivetrain needs to match or complement the engine - the converter needs to be sized to get you in the HP curve, the rear end along w/tire dia. needs to be sized to get you to the peak HP/RPM. You can have a 500HP engine and only run 13's on a miss match
 
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spidereyes455

spidereyes455

Master Mechanic
Mar 6, 2013
497
93
Northeastern PA
I know desktop dyno also made compatible a drag program that you can transfer your engine dyno files into and had a list of various different cars ,transmissions, gears, tires, converter stall speeds, track conditions , shift points ect. I think it was called Drag 2000. Not sure how accurate it woud be but like the dyno program it should give you a ballpark idea.
 
S

shoedoos

Master Mechanic
Jul 3, 2012
310
63
have a good wander through here.....

http://www.wallaceracing.com/Calculators.htm

use as many of the calculators in tandem to get info you want. Basically Wallace's calculators will give you an approximation of what your car is capable of.....they may not be perfect, but they certainly will give you direction....
 
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