Explain remote solenoid?

Bonnewagon

Bonnewagon

Geezer
Sep 18, 2009
6,066
2,234
113
Queens, NY
#1
I asked Pontiacgp what he did to run a remote starter solenoid. He said he connected the "S" terminal to the "BATT" terminal on the normal starter solenoid. The "BATT" terminal then got the battery cable that come from the remote starter solenoid. OK I get that the starter will be operated from the remote solenoid. But what happens exactly? When the starter motor gets 12 volts does the starter pinion gear move out and contact the flywheel by itself? Or does it need the normal solenoid to push the gear out? I know there is a contact disc inside the normal solenoid that energizes the starter motor and are we needing that as well as to push out the gear? I know on Ford and outboard motors the starter extends the gear just by the action of the starter motor turning. But if GM starters still need the normal solenoid to make the battery cable contact as well as extend the gear- what exactly are we accomplishing by having a remote solenoid? The starter is still getting hot from it's location. Nothing is being bypassed. What is the advantage?
 
TURNA

TURNA

Geezer
Jul 24, 2009
7,224
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#2
proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.maliburacing.com%2Fimages%2Fstarter_solenoid.gif&hash=14a0eeee71ad4d399f259dbc6f373aa3
 
Bonnewagon

Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
6,066
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#3
No Steve- you did well. I understand how to rig it. I don't understand how or why it works better.
 
TURNA

TURNA

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Jul 24, 2009
7,224
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#4
the heat doesnt ruin the solenoid
 
Bonnewagon

Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
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#5
the heat doesnt ruin the solenoid
The remote sees no heat. But if you still need the normal solenoid to work the starter- it gets heat.
 
TURNA

TURNA

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Jul 24, 2009
7,224
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#6
The original solenoid is there but you bypass it with the jumper wire
 
Bonnewagon

Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
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#7
Here is where a problem is encountered. It takes a fair amount of current to energize the stock solenoid when hot. Due to the amount of resistance in the wiring and starter motor from heat soak, the battery may not be able to supply the required current to the starter through the stock solenoid and wiring. This is where the Ford solenoid comes into play.
It just gives it a better current supply
OK! Hey Steve that is it! What you are doing is supplying the NORMAL solenoid with higher voltage than the stock wiring can provide. The NORMAL solenoid is not being bypassed or circumvented in any way. Is still works as intended. In fact I think a 1930's style foot operated starter button using heavy gauge wires would work just as well as the Ford solenoid.
 
64nailhead

64nailhead

G-Body Guru
Dec 1, 2014
898
1,017
93
Upstate NY
#8
I'm no fan of the remote Ford style starter solenoid for several reasons. First, it's for a Ford. Second, the solenoid isn't designed to handle the amperage of starter in
good condition unless the motor starts quickly and easily everytime. Get a weak starter or hard start condition or both a hard start condition and weak starter and kaflooey on the solenoids. A worn drive gear and flexplate will cause the same thing - excess draw on the starter that the solenoid cannot handle. Third and lastly, it's designed for a Ford.

Low voltage and/or low amperage will kill a starter and make it require more of both to function correctly and have any type of longevity. The best situation for any electric motor is correct voltage, all the amps needed and of course grounds that are beyond adequate. The Ford remote solenoid does not prvide enough of either if anything is not in tip top conditon.

My two cents - throw them at the neighbor's cat if you feel the need.
 
Bonnewagon

Bonnewagon

Geezer
Sep 18, 2009
6,066
2,234
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Queens, NY
#9
bypass the relay function
No Steve- it does not. Your own posting said that. You still need the stock solenoid to engage the starter pinion gear as well as to connect the "BATT" terminal to the motor windings. Otherwise we would be removing the normal solenoid altogether- right? All you are doing is bypassing all the stock wiring from inside the car. Instead, that wiring is going to the remote solenoid. The stock solenoid "S" terminal is hot-wired to the battery cable so that when the remote solenoid is actuated it enables the stock solenoid to engage the gear as well as connect the battery cable to the actual starter motor. All you are doing is providing a higher voltage, lower resistance circuit to the starter. Ever try to test a starter by hooking a jumper to just the "BATT" stud? Doesn't work does it? You need to hit the "S" stud as well, then it all works.
 
565bbchevy

565bbchevy

Geezer
Aug 8, 2011
6,145
5,174
113
Michigan
#10
The remote solenoid that has been starting my BBC's is over 20 years old and that was 10 years starting my 555 BBC with 13.5 compression
For the jumper I used copper bar stock instead of a wire and both my starter and headers are wrapped.
Also my cables are 1/0 fine strand welding cable.
The advantages that I like is there is only 1 cable on my starter and all the fusible links are away from any heat since they go to the remote solenoid.
The fact that the cable going to the starter has no power until it gets it from the remote solenoid.
The remote solenoid also is a great place to add accessory cables for high amp items.
As far as being a Ford part just add it to my 9" rear and vacuum pump for my brakes from a 95' F350 diesel, both welcome additions to my GM car.
 
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