Need some a/c help here guys

CuttyTee

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Thread starter
Feb 1, 2022
14
3
Just 1 can of refrigerant? 12 ounces? That's enough from empty to allow the pressure switch to cycle? Hmm. I was always under the impression that you would need about 1/2 a charge before the switch would cycle worth a flip. My mind may be off here, but it's what, 3.25 pounds of R12 (52 oz) for a normal G-body charge, thus at 85% you're looking at 44 oz of 134a. And a 12 oz can is about 1/4 of a charge. That just doesn't seem like enough. I haven't done a conversion in 600 years, so my memory ain't so good on that. You're not slugging liquid refrigerant in there when the compressor is engaged are you? If you do, it's Russian roulette for your compressor.

Maybe I'm missing something here. But it seems your oil amount is correct (now). The refrigerant is only going to carry whatever oil the refrigerant is going to carry. A tad more oil shouldn't hurt it. But not enough may. Good luck with this.
Where did you get only one can of refrigerate? Lol it take close to 4
 

Bonnewagon

Geezer
Sep 18, 2009
8,740
113
Queens, NY
12 ounces? That's enough from empty to allow the pressure switch to cycle?
I was curious about that too so back when working on my Jeep I tested. Total charge was 2 lbs. It took 2.5 ounces to get the low pressure switch to engage at 25psi low side.
 

69hurstolds

Geezer
Supporting Member
Jan 2, 2006
6,633
113
I used pag 150 both times. Put 2 Oz in low side line, 3 Oz in compressor. Spun with spaner wrench 20 times, quick engaged compressor 10 times for good measure after vacuum was pulled and and a can of Freon was put in
Your words, bud.

In English, "a can" means 1. If you were trying to convey something else, enhance the context a little.

It seems like you got this, so I'll leave you to it.
 
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oldsofb

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
Dec 7, 2007
1,217
113
Maryland
Back in the before times when I was a line tech, after pulling vac you could get 1 can in full. The next can would barely go because you equalized the pressure in the system vs the can hooked up. That was usually enough to get the comp to quick cycle on and off enough to pull the second can out. After that it was business as usual.

Hutch
 

random_farmhick

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Dec 13, 2020
31
18
I don't deal with automotive AC other than my own vehicles, but have been doing ac work on ag equipment(tractors, combines, skid steers, etc) for 15+ years. What are your procedures after the failure? just replacing the compressor, accumulator, and orifice tube? you really have to flush the lines, evaporator, and condenser at minimum, both ways because sometimes metal will get stuck in nooks and crannies in the hoses and fittings. Depending on the style of evaporator and condenser, there is no cleaning them, only replacement because you'll never get everything out, and 30 seconds or 30 hours, it'll take a compressor out again. Even new hoses, condensers, and evaporators SHOULD be flushed, because sometimes there will be junk inside of them from being manufactured, or stored improperly. I normally use mineral spirits to start flushing, and once I don't get any more metal or debris out, then I do a flush with an actual solvent based AC flush because the mineral spirits will leave a residue on the inside of everything that can break down the refrigerant oil of your choice...
 

CuttyTee

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Thread starter
Feb 1, 2022
14
3
Your words, bud.

In English, "a can" means 1. If you were trying to convey something else, enhance the context a little.

It seems like you got this, so I'll leave you to it.
ohh sorry my apologies lol I should have mentioned I guess, once pressure Equalizes and you can’t get it to take more Freon, but not enough in the system to trip low side switch, you jump the low side switch connector to engage the compressor long enough to pull more in. Some cars/makers you can’t, some you can jump the relay, some you have to supply power with a power probe straight to the compressor to pull enough in. Quick tip I leaned in school years ago. And to the book.
 

CuttyTee

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Thread starter
Feb 1, 2022
14
3
Thanks to all, my issues was 3oz short of oil. R12 to 134a conversation plus some false info I read in a hurry online had me believing it was less oil as well. Should have taken the time to find the four seasons application chart. Lesson learned there. And my other issue is ac bracket spacers. I can fit a .030 feeler gauge in the bottom of the compressor clutch but not a the top. Not even .010 so my compressor is at a slight angle, overheating the clutch which wasn’t helping the situation. Got some custom spacers coming from the bracket company to hopefully square things out. Got a new compressor, new accumulator, orifice tube on the way and PLENTY of oil. Will flush the remaining components as always and shouldn’t have any more issues.
 

78Delta88

Master Mechanic
May 23, 2022
300
43
SW Arizona
Seems like you got this, but also seems like going down a rabbit trail. Who made the compressor? You replaced it and it already went out? Sounds like a bad compressor.
 

CuttyTee

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Thread starter
Feb 1, 2022
14
3
Seems like you got this, but also seems like going down a rabbit trail. Who made the compressor? You replaced it and it already went out? Sounds like a bad compressor.
It went out so fast because I Did not have enough oil in the system unfortunately. Due to my confusion with the r12 to 134a conversation amounts. It was a brand new four seasons compressor tho.
 

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