Should I change the oil?

tkruger

Master Mechanic
May 6, 2015
330
63
NY
4.3 1987 Monte Carlo.

Normally I change the oil when I get the car out of storage each spring. I only use synthetic oil and high quality filters (Wix or NAPA made by Wix). My other vehicles I change every 5-6K same quality oil and filters.

Due to Covid etc.. last year I only drove the car 2500 miles according to my records for the mileage of the last change. Checked the oil and on the dip stick it still looks clean and is not at all low. Normally I would just say change it but it is not even black yet. Is it just a waste to change it at this point or should I?
 

ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
3,693
113
4.3 1987 Monte Carlo.

Normally I change the oil when I get the car out of storage each spring. I only use synthetic oil and high quality filters (Wix or NAPA made by Wix). My other vehicles I change every 5-6K same quality oil and filters.

Due to Covid etc.. last year I only drove the car 2500 miles according to my records for the mileage of the last change. Checked the oil and on the dip stick it still looks clean and is not at all low. Normally I would just say change it but it is not even black yet. Is it just a waste to change it at this point or should I?
I would.

Oil formulations break down over time. An oil can be glossy and amber but have lost shear strength and other properties due to age and time.

Modern oil is better than it used to be, but, for the $40? Why risk it
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

69hurstolds

Geezer
Supporting Member
Jan 2, 2006
6,266
113
I'll leave this up to the "Great Corn-OIL-o!" And he says...

6g2zrk.jpg
 
  • Haha
Reactions: 1 users

PVDave

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Oct 28, 2021
23
3
Arvada, CO
Other manufacturers may include this as well, but I know the Honda Owner's manual specifically states the oil should be changed after 1 year regardless of mileage.

As ck80 and Bracketchevy1221 said, time, moisture and oxidation all break down oil with or without heat cycles.
 

CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
Feb 20, 2018
1,620
113
Canada
Agree with all in favor of the change, and do the filter WYT (While You're There) For myself, I may have put +/- 1000 miles on my Non G-Body last summer and most of it was stop and go, short mileage. it has since sat in Bay One for the winter. I WILL be changing the oil very shortly and before first start up of the year.



Nick
 

ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
3,693
113
Agree with all in favor of the change, and do the filter WYT (While You're There) For myself, I may have put +/- 1000 miles on my Non G-Body last summer and most of it was stop and go, short mileage. it has since sat in Bay One for the winter. I WILL be changing the oil very shortly and before first start up of the year.



Nick
One thing I will add I always do if one of the cars has sat, covered, unstated for a couple of months or longer.... if it's FI I pull the fuel pump fuse. If it's mechanical I pull the tank hose. Then I crank it for a few seconds, let sit a bit, then crank it again. Then I put the fuses or hose back on and start.

Why?

Most starters turn the motor about 150-180 rpm while cranking. A running motor your in the 700rpm range.

If things dried up on metal surfaces, the difference in wear between 150 and 700 rpm while the lube coating builds back up in my mind is worth the 30 seconds of effort.

Just .02.....
 

79 USA 1

G-Body Guru
Sep 2, 2011
857
93
Cheektowaga, New York
Hate to admit this but this year I'm doing the "Drop the filter and add a quart with Lucas synthetic oil additive" on my 79 267 and 88 305. Just due to cost.
I had 500 miles on the 79 with Mobil 1 full synthetic and 850 miles on the 88 with the same Mobil 1. Normally I strain the used low mileage oil and run it in my lawn care equipment and have never had any issues. This year I'm chancing a second season on the Monte Carlo's just due to economics.
 

CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
Feb 20, 2018
1,620
113
Canada
Further to CK80's point about avoiding the dreaded "dry start' after a prolonged period of sitting, My electric fuel pump received a kill switch as part of its wiring harness when I did the initial install. I can do a crank over without fuel delivery just by flipping the switch to off.

The other item that I elected to plumb in was a Canton racing pre-luber system with an air pressurized reservoir that injects about a quart of oil under pressure into the oil galleries when triggered. It is also on its own electrical circuit and fused individually. It comes with a pressure gauge on the tank but I plumbed in a second gauge that resides in the cabin as a standalone attached to the steering wheel mast and which mimics the action going on in the engine bay. Flip the switch, in goes the oil, twist the key, light 'er off, toggle the switch off and the excess oil returns back to the reservoir. Never did take pictures of that; done a long time ago before show and tell was practical.

The other thing was that last year I bought case lots of the oil that I use and there is enough on the bench that I can do this year; scored multiple counts on the filters too. And No, was never in the Boy Scouts.



Nick
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

GBodyForum is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. Amazon, the Amazon logo, AmazonSupply, and the AmazonSupply logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates.

Please support GBodyForum Sponsors

Classic Truck ConsolesDixie Restoration DepotMike's MontesP-S-TSouthside Machine PerformanceUMI Performance

ContactAdmin@GBodyForum.comfor info on becoming a sponsor