BUILD THREAD “The Juggernaut”

Dayzedandkonfuzed

G-Body Guru
Feb 9, 2010
945
93
Anglemont, BC
Anybody have any recommendations for a good rotisserie manufacturer that won’t break the bank? Let me know if you do.

Ask, and you shall receive.

4tuam29-jpg.833369
 
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random_farmhick

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Dec 13, 2020
31
18
Is it just an age thing (yes, I called you old) or are you afraid of v-band clamps? Those three bolt flanges are reducing the adjustment you have, and undoubtedly complicating the assembly process.

Have you accounted for the thermal expansion/growth in the system with such tight tolerances. I posted a chart in the my Hellcat build that shows the rates between mild, stainless, and aluminum. This bit me in the *ss a bit using aluminum with over a 1/4" of change through the system.

Additionally, once the system heat cycles a few times it will change shape as materials bind-up and/or relax you may want to add a couple of slip fit connections closer to the tail pipes for future adjustment.

Just my thoughts.

Can't you just make a rotisserie out of a pair of large, wide-base, engine stands?

Alternatively this guy has a cool multi-use rig:
I'm only looking at this for the amazing work, and really don't have the ability to do half of what he does, but that was my first thought when I was seeing how close things are, he needs a slip joint of some sort and v band clamps to make adjustments after heat cycles and after he's done and actually drives it when everything "settles" into place.
 
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liquidh8

Comic Book Super Hero
I built my own rotisserie out of a couple cherry pickers, square tubing and threaded rod. But I also had more time than money at the time so it was worth it.

 
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Supercharged111

Comic Book Super Hero
Oct 25, 2019
3,589
113
Colorado Springs, CO
Cheap is relative to the quantity of scrap material one has available to them (wood or metal). If you're buying 'new', nothing will be cheap.

I believe you have missed the point sir.
 
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Rktpwrd

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Feb 2, 2015
3,788
113
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
I can't recommend a rotisserie because I don't think one exists that is worthy of the Juggernaut. I say use your skills and design one and send it.

Thanks Tony, and while I appreciate the sentiment, at this point in time I’m looking to purchase an already designed and engineered rotisserie. It’s not that I don’t have the skills and equipment to build one, it’s just that at the moment time is more important to me than money. I’ve got some cash set aside for the purchase, now I just need to find a reputable one that I can trust and get within a reasonable time frame.

From my research on the subject I would lean towards one that has the option of both wheels and stands. The stands make them more stable when in place working on them. Also in my opinion overkill is best you don't want a cheap one that's going to flex and transfer that flex into the body. I plan to get one for my blasting business and keep it in an enclosed trailer so I want one with large tires.

Couldn’t agree more on the overkill comment Eric. I REALLY don’t need a catastrophic failure at this point in time due to trying to save a buck.

Is it just an age thing (yes, I called you old) or are you afraid of v-band clamps?

Le Sigh.

I was really hoping I wasn’t going to have to justify and defend my use of the 3 bolt flanges to everyone, but now I guess I have to. Yes, I might be older than you, but I am not afraid of v-band clamps, or newer products and ideas. There’s several mitigating factors in the reasons why they’re being used, the first of which is that v-band clamps weren’t yet mainstream when this system was being built. They were just hitting the market at the time, and not yet widely known or available.

The second of which, is the price point and weight factor. I have 8 flange points for ease of serviceability/removal, and that adds up to a chunk of change in v clamps. The added weight is another detractor as the v-band clamps are considerably heavier, not to mention the fact that they’d have to be TiG welded on. Which I still don’t have the capability to do, so I’d have to pay someone to do it. More $$$ on top of more $$$.

The third and almost equally important factor behind continuing to stick with the 3 bolt flanges, is that I actually don’t want the adjustability they afford. I want the mufflers and the electric cutouts 100% locked into place without fear of them moving around. Any rotation in the mufflers or tailpipes will almost certainly result in losing my clearances and something hitting/rubbing/rattling.

Ever since v-band clamps hit the market, everyone has been quick to jump on the bandwagon and poo-poo 3 bolt flanges when the reality is that they worked just fine for years for the majority of people when they were all that was available. In fact, I’ve never once had an exhaust leak from any of my 3 bolt flange connections, on either car. I will be using quality copper crush type gaskets in the connections, so I really don’t anticipate any issues with them.

Yes I am aware that they’re old school and there’s better ways of doing things now, but these do the exact job I require them to do.

Those three bolt flanges are reducing the adjustment you have

Yep, and that’s exactly what I want. As mentioned above, I don’t want or need the adjustability v-bands clamps afford.

Have you accounted for the thermal expansion/growth in the system with such tight tolerances. I posted a chart in the my Hellcat build that shows the rates between mild, stainless, and aluminum. This bit me in the *ss a bit using aluminum with over a 1/4" of change through the system.

I have. If anyone understands how metal moves and reacts, it’s me. I am aware that the pipes will expand with heat, but it should only be marginally with mild steel. As nice as the weight savings are with aluminum, there’s a penalty to be paid for it. There’s a reason they don’t make exhaust manifolds out of cast aluminum.

As for tight tolerances, now that the geometry of the entire exhaust system has been corrected, there’s really only a couple of areas that are tight, and continue to be tight. Above the driver’s side cutout flange, where the tailpipes pass by the rear floor crossmember, and inside the quarter panel pass-throughs.
Above the cutout flange, I now have about 3/4’s of an inch clearance now that I massaged the floor there. I have roughly 1/2” of clearance either side of the pipes where they pass the floor crossmember, and the same amount through the pass-throughs. I want the tailpipes more or less anchored in place so they can’t move around causing rattles, where again, the solidly welded 3 bolt flanges will help achieve this. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate you looking out for me.

Ask, and you shall receive.

4tuam29-jpg.833369

Thanks, and as absolutely awesome as that is, I wouldn’t exactly trust it with the amount of weight that The Juggernaut is. She’s a heavy old girl. Plus as mentioned, I’m more looking for a pre designed and engineered one I can just buy.

I'm only looking at this for the amazing work, and really don't have the ability to do half of what he does, but that was my first thought when I was seeing how close things are, he needs a slip joint of some sort and v band clamps to make adjustments after heat cycles and after he's done and actually drives it when everything "settles" into place.

I really don’t see how having slip joint connections are necessary or required. Yes there will be some slight movement throughout the heat cycles until everything finds its happy place, but it shouldn’t be anywhere near enough to require flexible connection points IMO. Appreciate the comment, and the interest in the car though btw, thank you!

I built my own rotisserie out of a couple cherry pickers, square tubing and threaded rod. But I also had more time than money at the time so it was worth it.


That thing looks awesome Jim, well thought out and designed. I like the threaded rod for height adjustability in lieu of hydraulic jacks.
Where did you attach to on the body coincidentally? That’s one thing I’m not sure about yet.
 
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Clutch

Geezer
Apr 7, 2017
5,061
113
Brick NJ
Thanks Tony, and while I appreciate the sentiment, at this point in time I’m looking to purchase an already designed and engineered rotisserie. It’s not that I don’t have the skills and equipment to build one, it’s just that at the moment time is more important to me than money. I’ve got some cash set aside for the purchase, now I just need to find a reputable one that I can trust and get within a reasonable time frame.



Couldn’t agree more on the overkill comment Eric. I REALLY don’t need a catastrophic failure at this point in time due to trying to save a buck.



Le Sigh.

I was really hoping I wasn’t going to have to justify and defend my use of the 3 bolt flanges to everyone, but now I guess I have to. Yes, I might be older than you, but I am not afraid of v-band clamps, or newer products and ideas. There’s several mitigating factors in the reasons why they’re being used, the first of which is that v-band clamps weren’t yet mainstream when this system was being built. They were just hitting the market at the time, and not yet widely known or available.

The second of which, is the price point and weight factor. I have 8 flange points for ease of serviceability/removal, and that adds up to a chunk of change in v clamps. The added weight is another detractor as the v-band clamps are considerably heavier, not to mention the fact that they’d have to be TiG welded on. Which I still don’t have the capability to do, so I’d have to pay someone to do it. More $$$ on top of more $$$.

The third and almost equally important factor behind continuing to stick with the 3 bolt flanges, is that I actually don’t want the adjustability they afford. I want the mufflers and the electric cutouts 100% locked into place without fear of them moving around. Any rotation in the mufflers or tailpipes will almost certainly result in losing my clearances and something hitting/rubbing/rattling.

Ever since v-band clamps hit the market, everyone has been quick to jump on the bandwagon and poo-poo 3 bolt flanges when the reality is that they worked just fine for years for the majority of people when they were all that was available. In fact, I’ve never once had an exhaust leak from any of my 3 bolt flange connections, on either car. I will be using quality copper crush type gaskets in the connections, so I really don’t anticipate any issues with them.

Yes I am aware that they’re old school and there’s better ways of doing things now, but these do the exact job I require them to do.



Yep, and that’s exactly what I want. As mentioned above, I don’t want or need the adjustability v-bands clamps afford.



I have. If anyone understands how metal moves and reacts, it’s me. I am aware that the pipes will expand with heat, but it should only be marginally with mild steel. As nice as the weight savings are with aluminum, there’s a penalty to be paid for it. There’s a reason they don’t make exhaust manifolds out of cast aluminum.

As for tight tolerances, now that the geometry of the entire exhaust system has been corrected, there’s really only a couple of areas that are tight, and continue to be tight. Above the driver’s side cutout flange, where the tailpipes pass by the rear floor crossmember, and inside the quarter panel pass-throughs.
Above the cutout flange, I now have about 3/4’s of an inch clearance now that I massaged the floor there. I have roughly 1/2” of clearance either side of the pipes where they pass the floor crossmember, and the same amount through the pass-throughs. I want the tailpipes more or less anchored in place so they can’t move around causing rattles, where again, the solidly welded 3 bolt flanges will help achieve this. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate you looking out for me.



Thanks, and as absolutely awesome as that is, I wouldn’t exactly trust it with the amount of weight that The Juggernaut is. She’s a heavy old girl. Plus as mentioned, I’m more looking for a pre designed and engineered one I can just buy.



I really don’t see how having slip joint connections are necessary or required. Yes there will be some slight movement throughout the heat cycles until everything finds its happy place, but it shouldn’t be anywhere near enough to require flexible connection points IMO. Appreciate the comment, and the interest in the car though btw, thank you!



That thing looks awesome Jim, well thought out and designed. I like the threaded rod for height adjustability in lieu of hydraulic jacks.
Where did you attach to on the body coincidentally? That’s one thing I’m not sure about yet.
There's a generic kit for every manufacturer's vehicle bodies youl see when you start doing research
 
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