What did you do to your non-G body project today

Supercharged111

Royal Smart Person
Oct 25, 2019
2,432
113
Colorado Springs, CO
I like my gunmetal gray, not a chrome person.. haha

Factory blue on the 2002 and 2003 Z06 is Electron Blue Metallic, and like you said, it's the least ordered color.

I tried finding an EB car when I was looking and got nothing. I then learned that the commemorative edition was a thing in 04 only. Mine had factory stripes before the paint job.
 

CopperNick

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
915
93
Canada
Used Saturday to fabricate and assemble two new studs for the driver's side exhaust manifold.

Used Sunday to weld up the coil spring retaining strips that my neighbor across the street had cut down in order to shorten the depth of the seat bottom in his A pickup. Back story on this is old age and bu**ered knees. Beyond repair and replacement is not a high priority. So he is attempting to section the bench seat he is using to get more leg room to make entering and exiting the vehicle easier with semi-frozen knee joints. And I have to interpret what he wants and weld this all back together.

Used today to take the two new studs and slide under the van to fit them. That involved my trusty Dremel tool and the sacrifice of numerous thin body cut off wheels to amputate the corpses of the existing studs and trim the stumps down to the correct length while not dinging the gasket face on the manifold. Blew up about five of those skinny little cut off wheels because they do not like to get bound up in a cut and the torque from the dremel is sufficient to rip them up if they get caught.

A couple of test fits to get the stump height right and it was time for the some locktite. Permatex makes a spray on activator for use with its thread adhesives and Yes it does work. Cuts the curing time down from a little while to RFN. Get the fastener screwed down and tight because you only have one chance and that is it. When i put the collars on the studs I used Locktite "Red" and with the activator I just barely managed to get the collars screwed down and the correct depth set and they had set. No movement; nada. Works for me.

Just finished some work on the lathe; decided that the best way to seal that connection between the pipe and the manifold was to use a gasket but no one makes that item for a metal to metal connection so I made one. The basis was a 2" hard copper tube cap. Cut the body down to about 5/16ths deep and then chucked it into the lathe and used a hole saw attachment to core out the close off end to just under 2". I have a shelf bandit that I can use as a form to finish the shaping of the shoulder and then see if it will work. Sorry, no pictures so far. May take time to shoot a before and after shot of what I started out with and what i made of it, or not.

Tired.



Nick
 
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Texas82GP

Just-a-worm
Supporting Member
Apr 3, 2015
7,041
113
Spring, Texas
Used Saturday to fabricate and assemble two new studs for the driver's side exhaust manifold.

Used Sunday to weld up the coil spring retaining strips that my neighbor across the street had cut down in order to shorten the depth of the seat bottom in his A pickup. Back story on this is old age and bu**ered knees. Beyond repair and replacement is not a high priority. So he is attempting to section the bench seat he is using to get more leg room to make entering and exiting the vehicle easier with semi-frozen knee joints. And I have to interpret what he wants and weld this all back together.

Used today to take the two new studs and slide under the van to fit them. That involved my trusty Dremel tool and the sacrifice of numerous thin body cut off wheels to amputate the corpses of the existing studs and trim the stumps down to the correct length while not dinging the gasket face on the manifold. Blew up about five of those skinny little cut off wheels because they do not like to get bound up in a cut and the torque from the dremel is sufficient to rip them up if they get caught.

A couple of test fits to get the stump height right and it was time for the some locktite. Permatex makes a spray on activator for use with its thread adhesives and Yes it does work. Cuts the curing time down from a little while to RFN. Get the fastener screwed down and tight because you only have one chance and that is it. When i put the collars on the studs I used Locktite "Red" and with the activator I just barely managed to get the collars screwed down and the correct depth set and they had set. No movement; nada. Works for me.

Just finished some work on the lathe; decided that the best way to seal that connection between the pipe and the manifold was to use a gasket but no one makes that item for a metal to metal connection so I made one. The basis was a 2" hard copper tube cap. Cut the body down to about 5/16ths deep and then chucked it into the lathe and used a hole saw attachment to core out the close off end to just under 2". I have a shelf bandit that I can use as a form to finish the shaping of the shoulder and then see if it will work. Sorry, no pictures so far. May take time to shoot a before and after shot of what I started out with and what i made of it, or not.

Tired.



Nick
Switch over to these on your dremel....

 

Supercharged111

Royal Smart Person
Oct 25, 2019
2,432
113
Colorado Springs, CO
Got my Remflex gasket for the flipper dually, the regular gasket couldn't deal with the flange warpage. The Remflex worked on my own dually and it was more warped so this should square me away there. Since I was still in fix it mode from that truck I decided to crack into the cruise control on my 98 K1500. After needlessly removing, disassembling, and inspecting the cruise module, I shot the brake switch circuit and found that the brake switch itself is to blame. It sends a disable signal to the cruise all the time. While a switch is cheap, the suspected failed solder joints would have been cheaper.
 
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CopperNick

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
915
93
Canada
Texas82GP, had your message pop up in my mail forward notices and came looking to see what you had found.

The Lowes link apparently doesn't like me because it returned an "Access Denied" response to my attempt to visit the site. We no longer have a Lowes franchise here anymore anyway as they shut down two winters ago before the Covid fiasco appeared.

Did take a peek at the Amazon link and, unfortunately, can't use those wheels. The problem at my end is that I am now using the dremel quick release chuck and the matching accessories including both the thick and thin cut off wheels, the grinding wheels, and the abrasive puffs. Blew through and wad of the latter while prepping an SBC bellhousing for polishing. They work great in tight places and on rough surfaces but die easily and throw a brutal amount of dust; dust mask is not an option.

I did use those screw and mandrel mounted cut off wheels and did find that they worked okay but I was breaking them, more like shattering them, and having to deal with that little screw and jeweller's screw drivers was turning out to be a pita. The quickies are much simpler and faster to change out. Just pull the retaining sleeve back to free up the wheel, give it a quarter turn, and off comes the dead item and you're ready to pop on a fresh one.

Most of today's misadventures had more to do with what I was cutting than anything else. 3/8ths exhaust studs are not the nicest of fasteners to deal with and these were both rotten and slathered with Never-Seize. You can't push the tool or the wheel will bind and blow out (Repeatedly). so go slow is about the only way to proceed. The other thing is room and I had none to spare or I would have gone for either air drive or my infamous 4.5 with a razor blade hanging off the mandrel.

Anyway, appreciate the legwork and suggestions. Thanks for taking the time.



Nick
 
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CopperNick

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
915
93
Canada
DSCN2855.JPG


As a brief introduction, this was supposed to be an action shot of my custom built whee-ler in action. Turns out that it got more action that I bargained for as the first C15 tank, the one in the picture, turned out to have a damaged valve pocket and the bee-hive end on the gauges just would not seat right. HIIIIIISSSSSSS. So I had to return this tank and score a replacement.

DSCN2856.JPG
DSCN2856.JPG
DSCN2857.JPG
DSCN2858.JPG


And two of these, an heir and a spare were also items that I scored in my travels. I had been thinking about options in connection with my problems with that drivers side exhaust flange that had been leaking and decided that if I couldn't buy a gasket, (Not they exist for this issue anyway), I would make one. What you see here is a 2 inch hard copper pipe cap, the kind that gets soldered on my plumbers when they are doing pressure tests.


DSCN2860.JPG


DSCN2862.JPG



What I did to it was to first shorten its overall length by removing the chunk shown above. This left me with the cap end and about 5/16ths of body. Then i used a hole saw to cut a hole in the cap end itself. I considered going with 1-7/8" for that hole but ended up with 1-3/4" which worked out exactly. The piece that I cut out is what you see leaning against the section of cap body that I removed.


DSCN2863.JPG



DSCN2864.JPG



And this is my engine of mass destruction. Essentially what you are seeing here is a L.S. Starrett 1-3/4 metal cutting hole saw mounted on its mandrel and stuffed into a chuck that is mounted to the tailstock of my lathe using a morse taper adapter.

The key here was "Gentle" as in lean extremely gently on the wheel that extends the tailstock sleeve or the hole saw will bind and the lathe will throw the piece of work across the shop where it will get lost.

I sort of wish I had taken a picture of how I was able to shape the round "collar' that I had left by using the exhaust flange on the shelf bandit as a form and a ball pein hammer to persuade the copper to assume the shape of the exhaust gasket surface.

However, the result I got prompted me to immediately climb into the least dirtiest of my bunny suits and slide under the van for a test fit. That exercise resulted in my adding a thin coat of High Heat Copper RTV to both sides of the gasket, setting it in place on the pipe flange, left the whole assembly into position, and running the nuts home. The whole taco is now sitting while the RTV cures thoroughly overnight.

The Nuts? Are ugly, sort of, for values of the term, because I got rid of the small nuts and used coupling nuts instead. They are long enough to completely cover the studs and prevent rust from eroding them down to memories.

Then I went across the street and used my air saw to section my neighbor's seat some more; but that is another story.



Nick
 
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Built6spdMCSS

Master Mechanic
Jun 15, 2012
305
63
I tried finding an EB car when I was looking and got nothing. I then learned that the commemorative edition was a thing in 04 only. Mine had factory stripes before the paint job.
Yea I was going to ask where the stripes were..
 

MrSony

Geezer
Nov 15, 2014
6,157
113
Des Moines, Iowa
Reinstalled the sway bar on the t bird with new bushings and end links. screamed for over an hour trying to put the ****ing fuel pump on. said **** that sh*t and just used studs and nuts.

it doesn't look like it from the way the rear 1/4s are, but this car is super solid underneath. I'd wager its more solid than half of the g bodies on here :p

For the time being I'm just gonna keep tinkering on it until it sells. This weekend I'm gonna try and fix the power windows. 3 of the 4 dont work and are unglued from the track. Tank aint gonna be here till october, might do quarters this fall. We'll see what happens.

 
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CopperNick

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
915
93
Canada
That custom copper gasket worked. Lit 'er off and things sounded close to what i remember as being normal.

Let it warm up to operating temperature and come down to idle then shut it down for a good heat soak. Added some antifreeze to the overflow tank.

Recalled the previous hassles trying to install the doghouse and having the gasket fall off so grabbed a new tube of Marine/RTV Gloozit that is rated for rubber and fiberglass and married the gasket to the edge of the enclosure. Elected to use small shots of the adhesive spaced about 2-3 inches apart except at the curves where I went closer. Stuff grabbed almost immediately (Lot of that going on around here recently. LOL) Gave it a minute or five to set a little more and installed the doghouse, retrieved the section of carpet that covers it, set that in place, and then secured it by installing the supercover over it. The supercover is sort of a console affair that is stock to the vehicle; part glove box and part place for "stuff" to find a place to land and get lost.

Retrieved the passenger's side seat from the cargo bay and put it back on its pedestal.

Put all the misc bits and pieces back to where they used to be. got all the winter storage stuff removed and put elsewhere. Amazing how an immobile object possessing empty space so quickly becomes a storage locker. Actually got out the ladder and put a few of the boxes up on shelf 3. That is the highest shelf above the work bench and only Harley parts with no immediate demand for them get put there. Boxes have large printing on them so I can read the contents without needing to become Sir Edmund Hilary.

Paid a visit to Bob, my neighbor with the seat issues, and brought home another chunk of the project to play with. In addition to sectioning the width of the seat cushion, he wants to section the height of the seat assembly as a whole. Spent an hour re-cutting the outboard legs and jigging the frame up for welding. That might happen tomorrow.
 
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69hurstolds

Geezer
Supporting Member
Jan 2, 2006
5,604
113
FORD HAS A BETTER IDEA? Nope.

A while back I was thinking about when the last time the Focus had its coolant changed. Good lord, it hasn't. It's got the original reddish coolant in it. So, off I went and found all the Ford part numbers for the hoses I needed (I think there are 6 or maybe more hoses on this thing. One is about 8 feet long with all sorts of bends and crap on it that wraps from the passenger front of the engine, around the driver side and back to the firewall to the "RH" heater hose connection. It doesn't get driven much (6200 miles as of right now) but when it does get driven, I didn't want old hoses and coolant to be an issue.

What has started out as a "hey, the coolant/heater hoses on the Focus are pushing 10 years old. I think I'll replace them with the coolant" has turned into a freakish nightmare. The placement of the clamps and their clock positions were dreamed up by morons. You can't easily get to most of them without pulling half the front end apart.

I've no experience working on these cars. Zero. So you would think hoses/clamps wouldn't be much of an issue. The way they've sardine packed everything under the hood makes you think again. It LOOKED like not much of a deal, but soon took on a life of its own. So far I've had to remove the heater hose/upper hose distribution block, the complete intake system on the front of the engine (Direct injection so found a little oil baked on the back side of the valves. Thought about doing a cleaning on the valves while it was apart- but now? F** that.

The hose configuration is so stupid. The only GOOD thing they did was use the little lock tabbies on the heater hose to heater core connection, so a twist of the lock, then a grab and turn of the hose and it pops right off. The rest of it is a horror show. EVERYTHING is in the way. I had to remove the intake system because there's a hose that runs behind it between the engine and the intake runners. The upper hose seems easy until you get to the connection on the radiator. It's got a clamp that is supposed to face out toward the fender, and where it is sucks. The clock position could have been 12 o'clock with no issue, but no, it's at 9 o'clock when looking at it from the back of the rad. There's two sheet metal flanges in the way. WTF Ford?? In order to get to it easily, I'm going to have to drop the fan/shroud and the lower radiator/condenser support. Golly good god d***!!

Of course, trying to pre-plan this I sorted through the maze of Ford's stupid numbering system which seems to always use 42 supersession numbers in 2 years. So the numbers on the original hoses are different than the new hoses I found. I figured getting all my hoses from Ford was the best method because of knowing they'd fit. Boy, was I in for a fun ride. Of course, one was discontinued, but I found an NOS one from somewhere and snagged it.

I've never seen anything like it. I could find all sorts of videos on Ford Focus crap to get an idea of what I was looking at and anything to watch out for, but no. NO videos exist for replacing all the coolant/heater hoses on this car. Now I know why. Nobody ever does this as a DIY. If I took my time I could probably do this in a couple hours on a G-body. But NOooo. What a POS.

NEVER again. Now I know why people just run these cars until they puke then send them to the junk yard. At least this car will have good hoses for the next decade. Or maybe until it's run into the ground. I just know I'll never do this one again.
 
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