What did you do to your non-G body project today

Wraith

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Jan 13, 2013
1,236
113
DFW, TX
I own a bit of everything but yeah, its hard to go wrong with Stihl or Husqvarna. I have a hard time recommending any of their homeowner or farm/ranch saws (MS271, 460 Rancher, etc) mostly because I'm a snob but they are perfectly fine for a lot of people and a would certainly be an upgrade over any Poulan. They just have a lousy power to weight ratio. The Husqvarna 545 is a great entry level pro saw.

Don't discount Echo and Shindaiwa either. Their CS590 is one of the best bang for buck saws out there. I also like Makita (old Dolmar) but they won't be producing gas saws past 2022 and they don't have the dealer network that Stihl, Husqvarna and Echo have.
My problem is I don't use a chainsaw much, mostly at the hunting lease and I got this damn Poulan for free. I did manage to get it running with a new carb but tuning the carb has kicked my butt. I should just buy a new Stihl or something and throw this one away.
 

joesregalproject

Comic Book Super Hero
Nov 4, 2012
4,890
113
Pittsburgh, PA
My problem is I don't use a chainsaw much, mostly at the hunting lease and I got this damn Poulan for free. I did manage to get it running with a new carb but tuning the carb has kicked my butt. I should just buy a new Stihl or something and throw this one away.

Those small homeowner saws don't take well to tuning. They are finicky as hell. The MS250 is a good homeowner stihl that won't set you back too much. Echo makes a lot of saws that are a great value. If you think it might suit you, buy a top handle. The echo 355T is one of the better top handles out there and its not very expensive. Keep an eye out on Craigslist and Facebook marketplace for used stuff.
 
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Built6spdMCSS

Master Mechanic
Jun 15, 2012
334
93
My problem is I don't use a chainsaw much, mostly at the hunting lease and I got this damn Poulan for free. I did manage to get it running with a new carb but tuning the carb has kicked my butt. I should just buy a new Stihl or something and throw this one away.
As Joe mentioned, the MS250 seems to be a good one. I almost bought one but the MS261 I got was the right price. Just depends on how big and how much you need to cut. Facebook Marketplace seems to work well for finding stuff, I've got a couple for cheap that needed minimal work to make running.
We need a "What did you do to your chainsaw today?" thread. 🤣

Seriously, I should pay more attention. I'm moving somewhere with a lot of trees.
Haha not trying to hijack it but I'm down to talk about good stuff like this and try to give good info.

Question becomes how big and how many trees?

My dad was a logger back in the 80's and 90s, saws then were tanks and not designed as they are now for anti vibration and worker fatigue. Power was there but you'll be wore out in the end of the day.

Joe mentioned a few above, the MS291 would be my choice over the MS271, it just pulls much better, even more with light mods. Those are still home owner and farm/ranch category saws. Medium use but not on a daily extent. They will last taken care of.

I like the pro saws because of how light weight they are and for the power you get, on top of how the anti vibration system is on them. You bury it in a tree and feel barely anything. It just cuts. They are easy to work on also. Literally can re-build them on the back of a truck in the woods with the standard chainsaw tool kit. Well worth the money, and the ones I have I've been buying from eBay pretty cheap and fortunately so far they've been immaculate, well taken care of saws.

Here is a chart that I have been going off of that seems to be the standard for the Stihl saws. I have the MS261 Pro Saw, MS362 Pro Saw, and MS391 Farm/Ranch saw, which seems to be in the same category as the MS362. 391 is a solid saw, just a heavy pig. For the fire wood I cut from time to time and hurricane cleanup here in Florida incase it happens I'm setup pretty good.

SAW CHART.jpg
 
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ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
2,904
113
As Joe mentioned, the MS250 seems to be a good one. I almost bought one but the MS261 I got was the right price. Just depends on how big and how much you need to cut. Facebook Marketplace seems to work well for finding stuff, I've got a couple for cheap that needed minimal work to make running.

Haha not trying to hijack it but I'm down to talk about good stuff like this and try to give good info.

Question becomes how big and how many trees?

My dad was a logger back in the 80's and 90s, saws then were tanks and not designed as they are now for anti vibration and worker fatigue. Power was there but you'll be wore out in the end of the day.

Joe mentioned a few above, the MS291 would be my choice over the MS271, it just pulls much better, even more with light mods. Those are still home owner and farm/ranch category saws. Medium use but not on a daily extent. They will last taken care of.

I like the pro saws because of how light weight they are and for the power you get, on top of how the anti vibration system is on them. You bury it in a tree and feel barely anything. It just cuts. They are easy to work on also. Literally can re-build them on the back of a truck in the woods with the standard chainsaw tool kit. Well worth the money, and the ones I have I've been buying from eBay pretty cheap and fortunately so far they've been immaculate, well taken care of saws.

Here is a chart that I have been going off of that seems to be the standard for the Stihl saws. I have the MS261 Pro Saw, MS362 Pro Saw, and MS391 Farm/Ranch saw, which seems to be in the same category as the MS362. 391 is a solid saw, just a heavy pig. For the fire wood I cut from time to time and hurricane cleanup here in Florida incase it happens I'm setup pretty good.

View attachment 185404
Then you get guys like me that wound up learning dumb redneck. Bought a ms171 for limbing and brush. Had an ice storm, and both couldn't get to the other property where all the saws were and had to get some on-site damage cleaned away to get driveway usable.

That 171 cut up a 26" diameter (not circumference) Bradford pear trunk that was 12 ft length and all its assorted limbs that were 8"-10" themselves out to a distance of 30 ft.

It's meant for 4" and under stuff. It took a lot of work, wedges, etc, and there was some scorching as the narrow gauge chain wore, but it did it - just slow going. When the baby saw does that you know the good saws are worth your time.
 

Built6spdMCSS

Master Mechanic
Jun 15, 2012
334
93
Well that is the thing there, all saws will cut, it is how long you want to be doing it. Pro Saws are fast because time is money and the guys using them most likely run a business where as we all know, time is money.

I have Pro Saws because I want the comfort and power, I'm not in it to be fast, especially if I have major work to do. I just want them to work and not wear myself out using them.
 

Clone TIE Pilot

Comic Book Super Hero
Aug 14, 2011
2,686
113
Galaxy far far away
Replaced the rotted wooden front window on my house with a vinyl one today. Used R Guard Fast Flash liquid flashing for weatherproofing the rough cut and sealing the new window. The old window was really poorly sealed to the rough cut. No airdam of backer rod at all, just loose scrap insulation stuffed in.

Old houses are similar to old cars, you don't really know what POs did to them until you pull them apart.
 
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Supercharged111

Royal Smart Person
Oct 25, 2019
2,498
113
Colorado Springs, CO
Latest shameless LS1Tech plug.

Tonight I finished knocking down the remaining rotor deposits I could see, wiped them down, and threw them back on the car with new pads. I didn't completely remove the transfer layer as I didn't change pads, so my rolling roadblock pace at a new to me track should be good for rebedding naked bits of the rotors. Out back I found that the new pads I bought will come in handy in the future, apparently they were new for the last race and I brain dumped that bit. Fair enough. The car is ready to load along with the tools and crap I've offloaded to this point into the garage.

PXL_20211014_050856348.jpg


Yes it's dirty, yes it'll stay that way, and yes I'm bringing the quarter panel bandaid. But I've said it before and I'll say it again: I am so damn stoked to be heading to a new track! And I'm planning 2 more by December. I really hope to experience things that I haven't yet and develop new tools to use back home.
 
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MrSony

Geezer
Nov 15, 2014
6,185
113
Des Moines, Iowa
Took a 6 hour round trip in the truck for 2 reasons:
1: to truly test of the vented cap fixed the weird stumble. Yes it did.
And, to snag a 390 from an abandoned multigenerational 72 f250 restoration. i got it for $500. BUT, unbeknownst to me, damn thing already had an edelbrock aluminum intake, a weird 600 holley with a ford part number, and i talked em into giving me the headers. So, yeah. Damn good deal imo.
it used 3 quarts of oil on that trip. rip og 390.
 
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