Whelp..... progress? Hellcat engine to cease production after 2023 model.

jiho

G-Body Guru
Jul 26, 2013
867
63
Yes, a long drive or road trip would require more planning and stops but the car does all the calculations for stops and preplans everything, plus running the bottom 3/4 of the battery for your trip decreases charge times significantly, . For the majority of the population driving an EV would a great replacement for their ICE vehicle.

Charging times aren't that bad and you would NEVER do a 100% charge.
So the solution to the charging time problem is, on the one hand, to keep the battery mostly charged, and on the other hand, never charge it fully?

Is this satiric?
 
Oct 14, 2008
7,651
113
Melville,Saskatchewan
We still have coal powerplants here in Saskatchewan, it makes electric vehicles kind of pointless. The one at Estevan makes a Large Mouth Bass fishery possible, which is cool. There are plenty of Electric Vehicles in China, running off coal, again completely pointless. I just saw Politicians blaming the flooding on both coasts as climate change and how we must act now. Who knows what that might mean for older vehicles. We have 0 emission testing, only 95 and newer need a psychical catalytic converter in place in Saskatchewan. I am adding dual cats to my 70S. I need an O2 bung to tune the Qjet with a wideband. With the new Edelbrock heads, it will have a more modern chamber than a LS. It kills two birds with one stone. It will be interesting to see the next few years play out. Hunker down, it could get really ugly.
 
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69hurstolds

Geezer
Supporting Member
Jan 2, 2006
5,767
113
So the solution to the charging time problem is, on the one hand, to keep the battery mostly charged, and on the other hand, never charge it fully?

Is this satiric?
I agree with this thought. It's a bit confusing. The CAR pre-plans for you? Fugg that. I own the car, not the other way around. I should decide when I stay and when I go. Car should be able to meet my needs, not the other way around. I think the "refueling time" issue is going to be tackled eventually as well as pollution generated per mile (EV production isn't always environmentally positive) brought down, but it's grossly unfair to unleash 50-mile effective range cars on the "motoring" public and call it a win, or saying you have a 450 mile range on a vehicle, but are only able to effectively use 1/4 of it. Because that's not a win. It's just marketing hype.

So, until that happens, EVs in my mind will always be inferior. They'll get there eventually, but for now, color me not wowed. It's a force of hand to do this, so it's not even done with an invisible hand. (Which hopefully that invisible hand will b*tch slap the bastages responsible one day.) I'm not anti-EV, just anti-the way they're going about this in a cart before the horse method hoping technology will catch up some day. Idiots. Rushing causes more failures/setbacks, higher risks, and needless injuries/deaths.

I broke down and bought the wife one of those eco weed eaters because she complained about the gas unit being too heavy for her and I would always end up doing the weed eating in the front 40. Plusses are the battery unit is lighter, and you're not constrained to dragging a mile of cord (and I don't have to be the sole trimmer :) ). You charge the battery to full in about a little more than an hour, and you can get 1/2 to 3/4 of an hour run time back out of it. Which is just about enough time to finish the trim jobs out front after mowing.

Since that's all we use that battery for, it's not a big deal to put it on the charger when we start mowing if for some reason we couldn't put it on the charger right after trimming. Not supposed to leave it on the charger unit per manufacturer instructions. The point here is: it takes logistical planning with rechargeable batteries no matter what those batteries go in.

The total fix for EV would be to buy two batteries and swap one out, but that's not a viable option if you're driving coast to coast.

Here's an issue I have with this deal of "infrastructure" - How many gas stations were built on the taxpayer dime? So why does the taxpayer have to foot the bill for installing public charging stations? (Because it would it be like credit card transactions that leave a crumb trail every time you charge so your movements can be tracked? Tougher to disable that than it is OnStar if you're paranoid about being tracked.) Shouldn't the power companies be innovative enough to be incentivized to do this on their own? The good thing about charging stations is that they could be placed nearly anywhere without regard to placing underground gas storage tanks or having to bring in refueling trucks.

The bigger question would be- will New Jersey still require some pump monkey to come out and plug the car in? :p

Can't even move out of Packmyazzitan without screwing that all up, so I surely have no faith in having that same sh*t show force a transition to EV and have that go smoothly. Same circus, different clowns. As for those Hemis and similar type engines? Buy 'em while you can get 'em. Cuz when they're gone, they're gone for good this time.
 
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Oct 14, 2008
7,651
113
Melville,Saskatchewan
If electric vehicles really do only have a 1/4 of the projected range, they are completely useless here. Another thing, how much battery does A/C in Summer heat or the Heater blasting here in -40, use up? A study was done in Denmark in households will two vehicles, one being electric. The electric were being used much less, like 5000 km a year. Fuel is dam expensive there, pretty sure it is the charge time or range that is the issue. Maybe the Ion Metal batteries will be the game changer. Manufacturers have a lot of work to do, to make them an actually useful alternative.
 

Northernregal

Sloppy McRodbender
Supporting Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,481
113
Red Deer AB
So the solution to the charging time problem is, on the one hand, to keep the battery mostly charged, and on the other hand, never charge it fully?

Is this satiric?
For average use you arent supposed to charge past 80%, it prolongs the battery life. its also the slowest area of the battery to charge. Charging from 10% to 60% takes a charge at full capacity and is faster than the last 20%. You can tell it how much you want to end up with in your pack and it does it automatically.
I agree with this thought. It's a bit confusing. The CAR pre-plans for you? Fugg that. I own the car, not the other way around. I should decide when I stay and when I go. Car should be able to meet my needs, not the other way around. I think the "refueling time" issue is going to be tackled eventually as well as pollution generated per mile (EV production isn't always environmentally positive) brought down, but it's grossly unfair to unleash 50-mile effective range cars on the "motoring" public and call it a win, or saying you have a 450 mile range on a vehicle, but are only able to effectively use 1/4 of it. Because that's not a win. It's just marketing hype.

So, until that happens, EVs in my mind will always be inferior. They'll get there eventually, but for now, color me not wowed. It's a force of hand to do this, so it's not even done with an invisible hand. (Which hopefully that invisible hand will b*tch slap the bastages responsible one day.) I'm not anti-EV, just anti-the way they're going about this in a cart before the horse method hoping technology will catch up some day. Idiots. Rushing causes more failures/setbacks, higher risks, and needless injuries/deaths.

I broke down and bought the wife one of those eco weed eaters because she complained about the gas unit being too heavy for her and I would always end up doing the weed eating in the front 40. Plusses are the battery unit is lighter, and you're not constrained to dragging a mile of cord (and I don't have to be the sole trimmer :) ). You charge the battery to full in about a little more than an hour, and you can get 1/2 to 3/4 of an hour run time back out of it. Which is just about enough time to finish the trim jobs out front after mowing.

Since that's all we use that battery for, it's not a big deal to put it on the charger when we start mowing if for some reason we couldn't put it on the charger right after trimming. Not supposed to leave it on the charger unit per manufacturer instructions. The point here is: it takes logistical planning with rechargeable batteries no matter what those batteries go in.

The total fix for EV would be to buy two batteries and swap one out, but that's not a viable option if you're driving coast to coast.

Here's an issue I have with this deal of "infrastructure" - How many gas stations were built on the taxpayer dime? So why does the taxpayer have to foot the bill for installing public charging stations? (Because it would it be like credit card transactions that leave a crumb trail every time you charge so your movements can be tracked? Tougher to disable that than it is OnStar if you're paranoid about being tracked.) Shouldn't the power companies be innovative enough to be incentivized to do this on their own? The good thing about charging stations is that they could be placed nearly anywhere without regard to placing underground gas storage tanks or having to bring in refueling trucks.

The bigger question would be- will New Jersey still require some pump monkey to come out and plug the car in? :p

Can't even move out of Packmyazzitan without screwing that all up, so I surely have no faith in having that same sh*t show force a transition to EV and have that go smoothly. Same circus, different clowns. As for those Hemis and similar type engines? Buy 'em while you can get 'em. Cuz when they're gone, they're gone for good this time.
The car knows where the supercharge stations are and will set a route and tell you where and how long you need to stop to make your ENTIRE trip. You can change course and charge whatever you want but it will set an optimized plan for you. Just like if you take a turn in your nav. The wife can plan her pee stops and you can plan what your having for lunch.

The Cybertruck has a 500mile range, it will require about a 1:30 supercharge to get another +/-400 miles. in 5-8 years this will be average capacity and then it wont be a problem. The technology is evolving very quickly, stop waving your cane at the kids on your lawn. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 
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pagrunt

Geezer
Sep 14, 2014
6,979
113
Elderton, Pa
The technology is evolving very quickly, stop waving your cane at the kids on your lawn.
clash royale goblin GIF by Clasharama
 
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DRIVEN

Geezer
Apr 25, 2009
7,168
113
*CENSORED*
Any chance this announcement is like a KISS farewell tour? 20+ years later they're still selling tickets...because you might not get another chance.

As for the EV coercion, I agree with most of you guys. It's being done all wrong and the technology (and infrastructure) isn't there yet. Free market decides what makes sense.

I've said it before and I'll repeat it. When there is an EV that has...
-The same or better range as the equivalent ICE vehicle.
-Equal or lesser recharge time as a gas stop in the equivalent ICE vehicle.
-Same or lesser operating cost as the equivalent ICE vehicle.
Equal or lesser initial buy-in as the equivalent ICE vehicle.
-AND can do all of the above without any .gov subsidies, I'll probably buy one. Until then, it's an inferior product and I'll just keep burning dinosaurs.
 
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69hurstolds

Geezer
Supporting Member
Jan 2, 2006
5,767
113
The Cybertruck has a 500mile range, it will require about a 1:30 supercharge to get another +/-400 miles. in 5-8 years this will be average capacity and then it wont be a problem. The technology is evolving very quickly, stop waving your cane at the kids on your lawn. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
You're assuming the people in charge of all this knows what they're doing. I also believe that there are potholes in this venture when upscaled that are yet unseen. When I used to have to go to a job, I've done several test labs on small scale processes and while in theory it should have worked the same when you went full scale, you don't find the holes until you do. For instance, the discussions always talk about fuel savings, etc., etc., like cost per charge and so forth. But all of it's based on what costs are NOW. Guess what? Electricity costs will go up when demand goes up. It's not like electricity generation comes out of thin air. Someone's going to cash in. Which means all your electric sh*t is going to cost more to operate. How much more? At this point, it's going to be a toss-up because nobody really knows for sure.

So why don't they wait 5-8 years before making people wait too long for a recharge? I keep hearing words like "eventually" and "in so and so many years from now"... People aren't going to accept it if it's not an almost drop-in replacement, which is what most people will expect. The real bugger is going to be at what cost? It's not like some of these EV's are cheap. And they can't be subsidized forever. Economy of scale to help reduce costs may be on the horizon, but for how long? 5-8 years is a lifetime in electronic junk years.

I can see it now. In order to survive, Jeg's and Summit will be selling narrow and wide-ratio resistor packs for your manual transmission. Your shifter will be set up like the resistor bank for the heater fan. You think you're rowing gears, but actually just moving the switches to align resistors.

And I'm not waving any canes. I said I wasn't anti-EV, I'm just not sold on them yet. And anything that has self-driving mode (like the insipid Supercruise) can't be that exciting to ride in. I still believe we will have gas/oil cars into the next decade at least. May not be new, but they'll be there. How else can we prove the Road Warrior movies to be true? And then I'll probably quit driving anyway and move to my EV wheelchair.
 
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Clone TIE Pilot

Comic Book Super Hero
Aug 14, 2011
2,726
113
Galaxy far far away
Forcing EVs is just the first step. Next steps will be full time self driving, ban on manual driving, the end of private car ownership, and cars exclusively becoming B2B products for ride share companies. Slow recharge times won't be such an issue if you have a fleet of them taking turns.

Other issue I am concerned with is that after ICE production ends, how fast the decline in supply and quality of gasoline will happen. By 2033 gas may be hard to get and be horrible quality, besides any new red tape they may impose on its sale to futher force EV sales.
 
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08Malibu

G-Body Guru
Feb 9, 2014
885
93
North Jersey
Forcing EVs is just the first step. Next steps will be full time self driving, ban on manual driving, the end of private car ownership, and cars exclusively becoming B2B products for ride share companies. Slow recharge times won't be such an issue if you have a fleet of them taking turns.

Other issue I am concerned with is that after ICE production ends, how fast the decline in supply and quality of gasoline will happen. By 2033 gas may be hard to get and be horrible quality, besides any new red tape they may impose on its sale to futher force EV sales.
Underground ethenol.
 
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