Any tips on a temporary fix floor pan rust hole

Chased

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Feb 1, 2024
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Long story short. Just got the car the rear window has been leaking for quite some time. This is literally the only rot on the car. I really don’t want to start cutting the floor out. I’m thinking about cutting the bad and bending up a piece to fit. Body sealer and self tappers. I know I’m going to get flamed for this but paint and body is the last on my list.
 

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axisg

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Jul 17, 2007
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Yup, most important is to cut out the rot. Cut your patch and inch or so bigger than the rot you cut out. Self tappers to hold it in place while you trace. Lay down a bead of seam sealer on the body and line up your holes with your patch. My preference is pop-rivits ( they are alum and wont rot ). The 3\8 head teks leave a perfect hole to put the rivits in. Then shmoo the seam sealer around top and bottom for a semi-permanent repair.
 
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Clone TIE Pilot

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Aug 14, 2011
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Do it right, do it once and weld the patch in. Quick fixex always makes things worse in the long term. Body integrally should be one of your first priorities, not last.
 
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CopperNick

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Feb 20, 2018
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If Clone TIE pilot is the preacher, then I am the choir on this. Lay out and fab up your patch, use those screws as locating pins, scribe the edges of the patch on to the existing surface, lift the patch and start cutting out the rot.

Based on your picture and what I have found in similar situations, I personally believe that you need to strip back that seam sealer for another foot or two. What can look solid with the sealer in place can turn out to be anything but once you strip it down to expose the seam. What you have uncovered is the obvious ruin.

From the picture I get that your hole is immediately adjacent to the inner fender well; that makes me suspicious that the seam made from the attachment of the floor to the inner fender well might have issues as well. To that end, with more investigation, you might find more extensive decay than what is immediately obvious, So make your patches, because you might find yourself building a large repair panel out of smaller ones just to get the completed shape correct, somewhat larger than you think you might need. Once you know for certain how much metal you have to replace, then you can get to doing the trimming and tweaking needed to get to the final fit. Then burn it in. TIG if you can swing it, MIG as an alternative.

Not trying to be a total downer here, just remembering that this board has any number of horror stories posted by the various members about that tiny pinhole they discovered one day that, when they stripped off the finish to repair it, turned out to be a total crater once it was exposed.



Nick
 
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ck80

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The problem I see is if the rust is where I think it is, and I'm seeing what I think I am, you've got an important structural area compromised, not just a cosmetic flat panel repair.

None of us ever want our cars to get hit, but, if something bad did happen, you may have a safety issue there if you don't fix it right.
 
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Chased

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Feb 1, 2024
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If Clone TIE pilot is the preacher, then I am the choir on this. Lay out and fab up your patch, use those screws as locating pins, scribe the edges of the patch on to the existing surface, lift the patch and start cutting out the rot.

Based on your picture and what I have found in similar situations, I personally believe that you need to strip back that seam sealer for another foot or two. What can look solid with the sealer in place can turn out to be anything but once you strip it down to expose the seam. What you have uncovered is the obvious ruin.

From the picture I get that your hole is immediately adjacent to the inner fender well; that makes me suspicious that the seam made from the attachment of the floor to the inner fender well might have issues as well. To that end, with more investigation, you might find more extensive decay than what is immediately obvious, So make your patches, because you might find yourself building a large repair panel out of smaller ones just to get the completed shape correct, somewhat larger than you think you might need. Once you know for certain how much metal you have to replace, then you can get to doing the trimming and tweaking needed to get to the final fit. Then burn it in. TIG if you can swing it, MIG as an alternative.

Not trying to be a total downer here, just remembering that this board has any number of horror stories posted by the various members about that tiny pinhole they discovered one day that, when they stripped off the finish to repair it, turned out to be a total crater once it was exposed.



Nick
Good info Man! I just pulled this all apart really quick last night. I intend to pull more off this weekend and see what more I'm possibly dealing with
 

Chased

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Feb 1, 2024
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If I was to try to buy this part and cut/fit it what would you call it or search for. It’s not part of the pan from the replacements I’ve seen
 
Nov 4, 2012
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That's right where the inner rocker and rear seat pan meet the under-seat brace. As far as I'm aware, nobody reproduces it.

I don't know how you are using this car so it's hard to give good advice, but as previously mentioned, a piece of heavy sheet steel and pop rivets with some seam sealer will at least seal it up and keep the water and mice out.
 
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Chased

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Feb 1, 2024
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That's right where the inner rocker and rear seat pan meet the under-seat brace. As far as I'm aware, nobody reproduces it.

I don't know how you are using this car so it's hard to give good advice, but as previously mentioned, a piece of heavy sheet steel and pop rivets with some seam sealer will at least seal it up and keep the water and mice out.
It's just going to be a weekend cruiser with some power. I cant find anyone the does REPOP but a have a lead on a few cars I can cut it out of. Until then I'm going to do as mentioned.
 

ck80

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It's just going to be a weekend cruiser with some power. I cant find anyone the does REPOP but a have a lead on a few cars I can cut it out of. Until then I'm going to do as mentioned.
Whelp, that's the area right where the seat belt anchors, and, a couple inches away is your body mount.

Where I was going with my thought process is a 150lb weight in a 45mph to 0 mph decelleration (collision) has a peak force of 180 KN. That equates to about 45,500 lb ft of force if you want to picture it compared to the strength you put through a wrench.

I'd advise not to let anyone sit on that side till it's patched with good steel everywhere the anchors are based.
 
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