Remove rusted steel bearing from aluminum housing?

CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
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Canada
So take a run at it and post some pictures of the post battle carnage. My first job was in the parts department of a local small engine marine service dealer across town in little Finland. The whole service department spoke finnish as a first language and the things they did with the motors they worked on; the shop owner had a waiting list and line ups for work. Total Zoo, be trying to close up on Saturday night and in would come some tow job with a busted lower leg or skeg or totaled out prop and back on would go the lights. Insanity.



Nick
 

Bonnewagon

Geezer
Thread starter
Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
Geeze, around here the few marine shops that remain are more like Cadillac stealerships. The one still run by guys with dirt under their nails is the one that could not get the upper bearing housing out of the gearcase. That is what started this whole mishmash. I had a little water in the lower unit. I wanted to change seals before it got real bad. I dropped it off and three months later they had given up. The bearing carrier was unmovable. I got it out by drilling, chiseling, and swearing for 7 hours of intense labor. But debris had fallen down into the gearcase so I needed it apart. That is when the prop shaft bearing carrier also refused to come apart. But the upper bearing carrier is available and I have a new one. The prop shaft carrier is obsolete and hard to find. So I grabbed another parts gearcase on Fleabay figuring to break the stuck one apart and rebuild the spare with the parts. Then I found out the spare 48SPL I drove to Baltimore for also had some water in the gearcase. :doh:So I started taking it apart too. It was a freshwater motor so it is coming apart nicely and it is soaking in #2 oil right now. I will clean and reseal it when those parts show up. But the spare parts gearcase is the one with the stuck bearings I originaly posted about. If I can get those out OK then I am willing to destroy the saltwater welded gearcase and salvage the parts from it. This is turning into a big stupid winter project but if I am successful I will have two 48SPL motors with freshly sealed gearcases. Today I was able to removethe driveshaft and bearing housing from the fresh water gearcase. Here is a pic of the OMC driveshaft puller tool that extracted the driveshaft and upper bearing/seal carrier EZPZ. See how much of the carrier sits deep in the housing? That is what I chiselled out by hand.
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Bonnewagon

Geezer
Thread starter
Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
I got some more tools in the mail. I worked on the parts gearcase because it has the rusty bearings that I originally posted about. This one drives the rusty old pinion bearing down into the lower gearcase. I used lots of transmission oil before I attempted to get it out. Look at the rust on the needles. I have a new one on the way. Strangely, you can only move the old bearing down and out, then the new one down and in. I am also waiting for the tool that pulls the front gear bearings. That will be the real challenge.
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ssn696

Living in the Past
Jul 19, 2009
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So take a run at it and post some pictures of the post battle carnage. My first job was in the parts department of a local small engine marine service dealer across town in little Finland. The whole service department spoke finnish as a first language and the things they did with the motors they worked on; the shop owner had a waiting list and line ups for work. Total Zoo, be trying to close up on Saturday night and in would come some tow job with a busted lower leg or skeg or totaled out prop and back on would go the lights. Insanity.



Nick
There has to be a remark in there somewhere about never being Finnish. :banana:
 

CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
2,386
113
Canada
Y'all mean Fin-isshed? As in it being hard to fish when you took your deep Vee Hull into shallow water and tore the guts out of the lower leg??

Yup, chronic around here. Weekend warriors trying to make one hull design do something it was never meant to do. Good thing that that never to be sufficiently cursed R***h N***r never got around to using his self aggrandizing power of inquisition on boats or we all'd be having to swim out how ever far it might take to go fishing instead of floating out there on a hull and a prayer.



Nick
 

Bonnewagon

Geezer
Thread starter
Sep 18, 2009
9,028
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Queens, NY
you took your deep Vee Hull into shallow water and tore the guts out of the lower leg
That is why I have a small 15 foot Whaler. Shallow water is my area of expertise because that is where I get most of my fish. I wave at the big boats roaring past and wait for the wakes to subside. Then I go back to filling the live well with tasty fish. Like this guy I found in three feet of water as the sun went down. Best of all I only need a small outboard to get around and I use next to no gas. It only took my entire life to figure this out.:blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam::blam: 1641846517307.png :blam::blam::blam::blam::blam:
 
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Bonnewagon

Geezer
Thread starter
Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
The freshwater gearcase came apart pretty easy. Here are all the parts de-greased and waiting for me to fix the seal-worn grooves in the shafts. Just like a timing cover crankshaft dampener seal, if there is a groove, it will ruin the seal and leak. No jiffy-sleeves available for outboards. I do the Marine Tex fix where I fill the grooves, sand them down flush, then the seals don't leak. I left all the bearings alone as they were in good condition. All this work is just for a seal job.
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Bonnewagon

Geezer
Thread starter
Sep 18, 2009
9,028
113
Queens, NY
It can be drilled, ground, threaded, sanded, almost everything you can do with metal, except welded. I have used it to fill cracks, voids, grooves, anywhere you need a solid repair that will withstand the elements. It is excellent at filling in a stripped hole so it can be re-threaded. But extreme heat will defeat it so no exhaust repairs. What I will do with this is grind most of it off with a Ny-lock medium grit disc. Then I take a strip of wet-dry sandpaper and wet-sand it flush to the shaft. All that should remain is the filled-in groove. I do this all the time for timing cover and companion flange seals. Why replace those expensive and hard to find parts when all you need to do is repair the scratches and grooves. This repair will even outlast a Jiffy-sleeve type repair.
 

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