Yep, moved to the Klopeks, now for renovations!

DRIVEN

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Apr 25, 2009
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*CENSORED*
Same types of savages that toss BigGulp cups out the window. "Someone else will take care of it."

After my place had closed and I picked up the keys I did walk-thru and they had done a pretty good job of cleaning everything up. It wasn't until a day or two later that I discovered that the seller had half filled the 12x16 shed with abandoned furniture and other trash. It was almost completely empty before closing. Classy move.

Sounds like they won't be missed if the neighbor is any indication. Are you going to need to do much inside in the way of paint, carpet, etc?
 
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ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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Same types of savages that toss BigGulp cups out the window. "Someone else will take care of it."
I've got a strong feeling that the former denizens of the house were the source of most, if not all, of the trash that wound up blowing around the neighborhood and into the drainage systems
After my place had closed and I picked up the keys I did walk-thru and they had done a pretty good job of cleaning everything up. It wasn't until a day or two later that I discovered that the seller had half filled the 12x16 shed with abandoned furniture and other trash. It was almost completely empty before closing. Classy move.
Had one house that went kind of like that. And, after that experience, I said never again. Thus the 30 minutes before closing walk-through where I head straight to the table after.
Sounds like they won't be missed if the neighbor is any indication.
I think you're right. Everyone nearby is likely to see an increase in property value and decrease in trash blowing to their yards too
Are you going to need to do much inside in the way of paint, carpet, etc?
Depending how you look at it, either unfortunately or fortunately yes, everything and then some. Unfortunate for the work. Fortunate in two ways that we get to make the updates to our taste and that we get to claim the increase in value which comes along with the refresh. But, at least we're not paying the higher price for someone having already done all that.

There's a lot of garish colors when it comes to walls and carpet, and, 2 of the rooms have heavily soiled carpeting. One bedroom door I'll be replacing most likely, just because there are literally hundreds of things stuck and glued to it. Path of least resistance and time/cost may be to replace it.

Some of the things I'd like to do may be tough to do down here though, the materials have fallen out of vogue - for example, I'd like to replace the vaulted family room floor carpet with irregular multi-color vermont slate.... but, alas, haven't seen it for sale anywhere around locally, I hear it was a 'thing' ten-twenty years ago, especially on patios, but not lately.

So, I'll need to pick a plan 'b' for in there.

Stage 1 will be paint at least 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, kitchen, and vaulted living, plus flooring replacement in the vaulted living, master bedroom, and enclosed sunroom.

Those are the things and rooms that will be hardest to do after moving in because of the massive furniture. Other rooms, bedrooms, family room, etc can be done afterwards as we go to keep the timeline short enough where not much outsourcing will be required.

Over the next year I've got a feeling it'll be almost like a full time job bring the house up to par, just so much in terms of deferred maintenance and neglect. But there should be many projects to share, so, there is that side of things.
 
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ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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So, dumba**es being dumba*es, we went by the place today to check up on exactly what they did and how bracing for the worst. The cleanup wasn't what we discussed.

The mixed debris piles they just blew or raked against the tree trunks, unhealthy for trees and still needs bagged/removed. whatever.

The rotting limber on the ground behind the steel shed? Still there. whatever.

removing all this mess and not burning it? They made fires including one out of a 5+ foot tall pile. whatever.

disposing of household trash heaps? They burned it and then went home leaving the fire unattended. whatever.

A Need tondispose of contaminated ash and seed burned lawn.... WHATEVER!!
(i mean, we already had to reseed where the 4 junk cars sat, the broken ghetto backetball plastic water base, amd where the blocks and gravel were.

BUT. You ignore all that trying to be good natured about just finishing? When they made the biggest fire they admitted to rolling in some massive old wood normal folks would know will NEVER burn absent a multi year drought and never raining. So, there's some rotting, 14-16" diameter 10-12 foot logs resting in an ash pike. And as much as joesregalproject has a shed full of magic stihl toys that want a go at chopping it up, a mixture of time, effort, cost, and why the f*** should we be cleaning up their mess they contractually said they would clear. Well, they're dealing with these 3 massive damn logs and cam get dirty as f*** from the ask and creosote all over them now.

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Enjoy my cheap yard cane for context of size. And the 3 foot tall yard weeds. Neighbors in the subdivision must love those.

So, lazy being lazy bites them again. They can remove by walk-through tomorrow at 3 or we postpone the closing again costing them $$$. Not going to make messes bigger and expect me to wipe up after them. I'm no candy striper to clean up their ****.
 
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Nov 4, 2012
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Those rotting logs suck to cut with a chainsaw. They are usually really hard and/or filled with dirt and will dull a chain really fast. Especially now that they have been burned and are covered in carbon and soot. Burned wood will dull a chain quickly on its own.

Hope they get their sh*t together so you can close on it. Home buying is stressful.
 

ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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Those rotting logs suck to cut with a chainsaw. They are usually really hard and/or filled with dirt and will dull a chain really fast. Especially now that they have been burned and are covered in carbon and soot. Burned wood will dull a chain quickly on its own.

Hope they get their sh*t together so you can close on it. Home buying is stressful.
I used to kill chains cutting 20 year piled up red oak logs.... had 2 inches rot and a core of 20 inches hard as heck about a decade ago. Wasn't a smoldering mess though, yet still never did it again. Wouldn't even contemplate it using the only undersized tired limb saw I have on hand either.

Wouldn't want to guess what pita they would be to do something with, or, how much soot permanently wrecks clothes and takes forever to get off truck bed after and dirties every non-debris load to come in the interim. Not to mention heavy as heck.

We're willing to saw whatever to most of what's left, but not those logs. No wood infesting orgs attracted to yard more than necessary thanks, and, it's square in the way with future development plans for the site.
 

ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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So, finally, after many delays and multiple closing pushes I can officially say we closed on this thing. FINALLY.

Now the real battle begins.

So much to buy. So much to fix.
 
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ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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So, began three sets of measurements today:

1) to replace the flooring through the whole house. This will be done ourselves, albeit probably in 4 or 5 stages. To say there will be much tile work in my future is an understatement.

2) to buy some type of shiplap or v notch planking to surface the vaulted ceiling in the living area with the fireplace.

3) one closet had some decent water damage prior to the house's roof replacement. I am re-doing that closet entirely in cedar, ceiling to walls, to trim and baseboards. But, do need to know the necessary volume of different shapes.

We have a local sawmill I plan to visit. Even if it isn't a price discount to the big chains, I expect the lumber quality will be higher. I've never used them, but, other places I lived I always sourced from local mills so fingers crossed.

Aside from that, I'm in tractor-quagmire-hell.

My old mtd troy pony needs work. Engine runs great, the rest not so hot down to needing some welding done. It's also going to remain undersized with the amount of mowing surface to handle, including the ROW by the street.

I can't see paying $2k for that new disposable crap that dies in 500-1000 hrs. I also need more utility than just a mowing deck (read 3pt hitch and pto) But there is enough work in the house alone that I can't mess with rebuilding lots.

Thought I found a deere 322 but it sold before I could go after it. Ideally I want a yanmar engine, whether it's the 3cyl converted to gas like the 322, or, a 330/455 something in that range. Looking for a many many thousand hour unit, but being cheaper than your average gbody owner in the process. Extra implements like rear tiller, bagging cart, lawn roller, dethatcher.... you get the idea. Tiller being most important. But I'd take blades or snowblower in the pkg if one came up.

I saw some really old deere 110s with piles of smaller attachments cheap. But that's a trip to new england. And I'd probably be needing to work on the engine....

If anyone knows of a good condition machine near them please let me know. I'd consider anything I could find within a day trip of coastal georgia, mainly because I'd need to find somewhere to park a trailer overnight on the road which.... can be tough to get. Wouldn't want to leave it all out there exposed if I can't drive home the same day.
 
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ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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Incremental progress.

Ordered 800 travertine tiles at a weight of 14.25 lbs each. Put another way, that's 1800sq ft or 11,400 pounds of 1/2" thick stone not counting crate weights.

I'm told it should arrive from turkey in about a week to 10 days. Then the yukon gets to show its grunt.

Anything not hardwood is getting the axe.
 
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ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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For those following along, today began some serious deconstruction.

Removed about 1200 sf worth of 20 year old carpets, foam pad, and tack strip off concrete slab.

Unfortunately, guilty of not taking many pictures, and none of the finished empty rooms.

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So use that to start your imagination. Today did the family room, living room, dining room, den and bonus room. Took a trailer load of carpet to the dump, it was 8 cents a pound well-spent.
 
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ck80

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Feb 18, 2014
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Today bought another old MTD/Troy bilt mower to keep at this house.

20220528_182421.jpg

Supposedly it was used 2 seasons for fall leaf collection, the chute guard is off because the bagger needed its own connection bolted on. The OEM guard was included and is in the truck. Reportedly only had about a dozen hours of run time before sitting in the back corner of the workshop unused for a bit.

For $300 we really couldn't go wrong considering what the price new.

This also alleviates the rush for a garden tractor and let's us shop around for a good deal.
 
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