Delay wipers

Wageslave

Wageslave

Royal Smart Person
Jan 25, 2017
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113
I have a Bonneville wiper motor in the mail, should be here Friday.
 
Longroof79

Longroof79

Rocket Powered Basset Hound
Oct 14, 2008
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Gainesville, Fl
Also, if you can do a side by side comparison. I hope the Bonneville motor is a success. Again, I'm interested to see how it works out. Good luck!
 
CDUNIGAN1981

CDUNIGAN1981

Master Mechanic
Mar 15, 2015
263
63
Interesting... I have always understood that the circuitry of a delayed wiper is one of the most valued patents of all time.
Apparently, it is so perfect and simple that it couldn't be improved upon and the guy that patented it gets a few cents for each on used.

A few cents times every car= bags
 
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Wageslave

Wageslave

Royal Smart Person
Jan 25, 2017
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Good news, everyone!

The motor arrived today, and it was everything I hoped for. It's smaller on all sides, and the wiring pigtail matches my schematics perfectly.
IMG_20200319_131159.jpg IMG_20200319_131145.jpg

I pinned it together and it mostly matched up with how I thought it would work. The only exception is the big accessory power wire needs to run seperately to an ACC power source in the fuse box. This thing likes AMPS. I test ran it off of my 28 amp power supply and high speed would kick it out instantly.

I pinned it into the old harness and all functions on my 2 speed switch work perfectly.

IMG_20200319_132802.jpg

On the upside, the way this motor is set up it would not be hard to add a delay without changing the switch. All you would have to do is add a 500K potentiometer onto the low speed/delay wire, and this would make your low speed position into a delay.

The crank arm will need changed due to the larger ball end on the Bonneville motor, but the S10 one bolts right on. It looks like it will work best with the motor in the 6 o'clock position, and it looks like there are flat spots on the bracket to drill holes without issue.

The only significant downside to this motor is that this motor doesn't have the hidden park system.
 

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Longroof79

Longroof79

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Oct 14, 2008
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Gainesville, Fl
Thanks so much for your continued perseverance and sharing the info with the members. How does the motor compare with a typical G-body motor? Is it more powerful and is the high speed function faster? It's nice that it's a smaller unit. Will the crank arm from a G-body fit? I guess you had to re-drill the mounting base to position the new motor? Is the S-10 and Bonneville plugs identical?
Also, have you determined the park position of the wipers? Where is the washer pump located? Sorry to barrage you with a multitude of questions.
(y)(y)(y)
 
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Wageslave

Wageslave

Royal Smart Person
Jan 25, 2017
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Thanks so much for your continued perseverance and sharing the info with the members. How does the motor compare with a typical G-body motor? Is it more powerful and is the high speed function faster? It's nice that it's a smaller unit. Will the crank arm from a G-body fit? I guess you had to re-drill the mounting base to position the new motor? Is the S-10 and Bonneville plugs identical?
Also, have you determined the park position of the wipers? Where is the washer pump located? Sorry to barrage you with a multitude of questions.
(y)(y)(y)
Generally, I am guessing the motors are about equal power-wise. I can't really tell much on speed, since I haven't got the wiper transmission hooked up yet. I will have to drill three new mounting holes in the mounting bracket, but the threads are in the motor casing, so I won't have to deal with the bracket holding threads.

The Bonneville plug is different from the S-10 plug, as the Bonneville motor has a couple of extra wires.

The G-Body crank arm will not fit, as it uses a dual flat style hole, while most newer motors use a tapered and splined crank arm. The Bonneville arm won't fit, as the pivot ball is too big to fit the wiper transmission. The arm from the S-10 fits the Bonneville motor, and has the correct sized pivot ball to fit the G-Body transmission.

This motor doesn't have the recessed park function, but since the arm is splined your motor orientation is fully independent of where the crank arm parks at. Once it is mounted where I want it, I will just have to mount the crank arm to match where the old motor stops at.

This motor doesn't have a built-in washer pump like the old one does, since most newer vehicles have a washer pump mounted on the washer tank. I mounted an external washer pump on my car a while back, so I never really worried about it.

Hope that helps
 
Longroof79

Longroof79

Rocket Powered Basset Hound
Oct 14, 2008
10,683
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Gainesville, Fl
Thank you again for all the detailed information. A junkyard trip might be in order. As far as the washer pump is concerned, it should've concerned me when seeing that the Bonneville wiper motor is smaller than the G-body unit. In fact, I took one of those remote washer pumps that are installed on the washer reservoir of an Olds Ciera. I noticed on my Ciera it had one of those nifty pumps. I don't care for any of the washer pumps on a G-body, old or new.
It entails drilling a hole into the reservoir and the pump is held in with a grommet. Frankly,I think it's an improvement over the other pumps. Even if I don't change out wiper motors, I'd still like to incorporate that pump.
 
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Wageslave

Wageslave

Royal Smart Person
Jan 25, 2017
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I got the motor installed and everything hooked up, and it works quite well. I drilled the three bolt holes and the locating pin in the plate and one of the bolts ended up on a support rib. This wasn't a huge deal, as I just put a fender washer on the motor side for that bolt, and
everything tightened up nicely.

IMG_20200321_173720.jpg

I had to add a little bit of a bend to the S-10 crank arm to shorten the stroke a little bit. That thing is surprisingly hard to bend.

IMG_20200321_162022.jpg


There is a notch in the firewall that the motor will slot into without actually touching anything. It's not a super tight window, but definitely something to be careful of. I drilled the locating pin first, then once I verified it was in a good place, I used a cardboard template to transfer the holes over. The mounting plate doesn't have enough room for a standard drill to fit in, so a Dremel was used to drill and widen the holes.

I used .185 spade terminals to connect to the original wiper motor connectors. I may cut the connectors eventually and hardwire it, but I want to know that everything is going to work long term before I do that. I grounded the wiper and washer motor to the old motor mount closest to the brake booster. The power wire got ran inside the firewall through the grommet under the brake booster, and hooked to the wiper fuse in the fuse box. I was going to use a fuse tap to power the motor, but the fuse taps that I could find were only rated for 10 amps. Instead, I used an inline fuse holder with spade terminals on the ends with the motor wire soldered to the fused side. Looks a little dumb, but at least it is safe.

The wiring part is fairly simple, as you only need signals from the connector for each switch position.

Motor Wiring

Fat Yellow Wire - +12v in Run
Fat Black Wire - Body Ground
Purple - High Speed
Gray - +12v in Wash position (motor will continue for 4 cycles after triggered, to disable extra cycles add 27 k resistor inline)
Blue - Low Speed/Delay - +12v in Low Speed, 25k-680k resistance inline for delay.
Light Green - Unused
Small Black - Unused

Connections from motor to old connectors

Fat Yellow - Wiper fuse @ fuse box
Fat Black - Ground at wiper bracket
Purple - Purple wire on motor connector
Gray - D Terminal on cover connector
Blue - B Terminal on cover connector

I still need to add the delay wiper switch in the column, but once the switch is changed the swap will be complete. If you don't want to change the switch out, you can just cut the low speed wire and add a 1 Megohm potentiometer inline. Easy peasy.

Here is a video of it working.

 
69hurstolds

69hurstolds

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Jan 2, 2006
3,887
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I still need to add the delay wiper switch in the column, but once the switch is changed the swap will be complete. If you don't want to change the switch out, you can just cut the low speed wire and add a 1 Megohm potentiometer inline. Easy peasy.
Great job!!!

And that switch is going to be the expensive part. But IMO, if you're going to do it, unless you're an idiot and force something to break it, the switch should last forever. So worth it, IMO. Because everything on the inside at least, will look and operate like factory intended. If you're lucky, you could snag one from a junker column as well, but who knows what condition they would be in.

For G-body...1984 and up

Turn signal stalk lever (with cruise and delay): GM p/n 25031456 or equivalent supersession or aftermarket.

Switch for inside the column: GM p/n 7843683 (delay wiper, pivot for dimmer switch) or any equivalent aftermarket p/n. Ensure it has the delay wiper feature. The turn signal stalk markings doesn't matter for operating delay feature. NOTE: Everything I can find for Pontiac G-body shows that if it had delay wipers, CD4, it had tilt wheel, N33. It doesn't list any configuration of having delay without tilt. But it may have tilt without delay. Weird.
 
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