Is anyone else shocked/not shocked or confused about the current G body market and prices

J

Jeremy Lewis

Not-quite-so-new-guy
Nov 10, 2017
18
23
3
#11
A few other factors....

In general g bodies weren't garaged and babied. After Grandpa was done with it, grandson got it and beat the piss out of it.

Cash for Clunkers saw to it that several were crushed.

Circle track drivers are buying them and throwing away what they don't need.

Without after-market parts, otherwise servicable cars are being parted out.

They just aren't as plentiful as they once were and popularity is soaring.
 
regalman4925

regalman4925

Royal Smart Person
May 9, 2007
1,420
72
48
Omaha Nebraska
#12
That stuff is all contributing for sure!
 
tc1959

tc1959

Comic Book Super Hero
Dec 23, 2009
3,837
1,312
113
Surprise AZ.
#13
https://www.hagerty.com/articles-vi.../23/25-hottest-collector-vehicles-winter-2019
While we’re talking about El Caminos, the 1978–87 generation made the largest jump of any vehicle in the Top 25. Fueled by increased insurance activity and a rise in HPG values, the fifth-gen El Camino gained 25 points and leaped from 270th into a tie for 24th with 80 points. Newton wonders if it might be “because more people are starting to look at these as collectible rather than just used-up old pickups.” I knew the old girl had it in her.:D
1040090_10203331966048334_798146646_o-jpg.108485
 
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regalman4925

regalman4925

Royal Smart Person
May 9, 2007
1,420
72
48
Omaha Nebraska
#14
https://www.hagerty.com/articles-vi.../23/25-hottest-collector-vehicles-winter-2019
While we’re talking about El Caminos, the 1978–87 generation made the largest jump of any vehicle in the Top 25. Fueled by increased insurance activity and a rise in HPG values, the fifth-gen El Camino gained 25 points and leaped from 270th into a tie for 24th with 80 points. Newton wonders if it might be “because more people are starting to look at these as collectible rather than just used-up old pickups.”
I'm surprised that there are not more G bodies listed on there. I would have for sure thought that turbo buicks were on there considering the fact that they are the highest priced g bodies out there. That market has gotten insane lately
 
blk7gxn

blk7gxn

Greasemonkey
Feb 7, 2019
221
127
28
#15
Some really really great points of conversation on here. I think too, its hard to take in and process ( for me at least) when you grew up in the "G" body era and knowing the cars used to be readily available and also cheap to obtain, THEN, and now seeing a totally different environment to adjust too. The higher demand and higher prices are truly great for the sellers, not so much for the buyers, not saying if you dig hard enough or long enough you might still get a great deal, but it surely is getting harder and harder to obtain those finds and deals.
 
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Anubis

Anubis

Royal Smart Person
Mar 30, 2012
1,618
822
83
#16
https://www.hagerty.com/articles-vi.../23/25-hottest-collector-vehicles-winter-2019
While we’re talking about El Caminos, the 1978–87 generation made the largest jump of any vehicle in the Top 25. Fueled by increased insurance activity and a rise in HPG values, the fifth-gen El Camino gained 25 points and leaped from 270th into a tie for 24th with 80 points. Newton wonders if it might be “because more people are starting to look at these as collectible rather than just used-up old pickups.” I knew the old girl had it in her.:D
I never get sick of looking at your car....Very nicely done!
 
69hurstolds

69hurstolds

Royal Smart Person
Jan 2, 2006
1,321
1,731
113
#17
Car collector lists are just about as bad as the auction block phenomenon. I mean, who really looks at that list and determines what's hot and what's not? Looking at that list, if it is a truck, it wins, if not, there's not a single G-body coupe/sedan I saw on that list. And a VW Corrado? Please. Sorry, but to me, someone else's lists don't mean shit.

Based on what I've seen on ebay and autotrader, classic car buying sites, etc., the advertised prices are not what I call in collectible status. Sure, there are car dealers that jack the shit out of the prices just hoping someone will bite. But still, you can find a good solid low-mile G-body in the teens easily and that's about what it would have cost new without inflation. Put in the inflation and you're getting it at used car prices, in comparison.

When 60s and early 70s era stuff is going for 40, 50 or 60 k, that is about 10 to 15 times what they cost new. This would mean the G-bodies would need to start about 110 K to begin to play in that same level of $$$.

I just don't see it happening in my lifetime. But if it does, I'll be a rich guy cuz I'll sell all my shit then. :)
 
Ribbedroof

Ribbedroof

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Jan 4, 2009
2,545
2,171
113
Wellston, OK
#18
I won't say I disagree that values are rising, but the market locally is not really reflecting collector status.

Honestly, most of the G bodies for sale locally are pretty much used up, butchered, or big wheel/lowrider cars. In fact, I can only think of 1 clean ORIGINAL malibu for sale in the last 10 years.

I would love to find a clean original driver-type G body, but they just don't turn up in my area very often.
 
oldsofb

oldsofb

G-Body Guru
Dec 7, 2007
689
1,105
93
Maryland
#19
Another factor is the growing parts bin of replacement items you can get. When I bought my 442 you could count on one hand the sheet metal available. That list has blown up along with the small hard to find items, and the list keeps growing. People will buy what they can restore. The parts are there to do that now (just about).

As far as scarcity of whole, good cars, I agree with the shrinking market there. It may be more common to have to buy 2 cars to piece together 1.

Hutch
 
69hurstolds

69hurstolds

Royal Smart Person
Jan 2, 2006
1,321
1,731
113
#20
Everything is regional as well. As with most cars living in the rustbelts, it's going to be hard pressed to actually use a car for what it is intended and keep the sheetmetal rust free. You find that rust-free example in Arizona or New Mexico, but you know the paint and plastic may be crispy. G-body cars had their share of weak/rust prone areas anyway, so they didn't always fare as well as their earlier siblings.

Fortunately, I live in the south where my 85 442 has never seen snow or endured weeks on end sub-zero temps. But there are many that haven't been as fortunate and have met their demise by mother nature or by accidents.

IMHO, and as much as I'd like to see it, the G-body, in general, will not garner the collectible status of many a car. Prices will rise just due to dwindling availability and still moderate demand, however, so this is a good thing for those considering buying one soon. Luckily, they made 40 zillion of them so it will take a while before the only place you see them is in a museum.

It's kind of two-fold issue to me though. Right now, you can still find project cars that are reasonable and you can still fix them up as far as you want to. Collectible status forces out more the hobbyist who likes to have car fun on the cheap. Enjoy them now while they're still able to be found.

But here's my gage on whether the G-bodies reach the "collectible" status: When the average hot-rodder who likes dropping LS engines in their cars stop doing that and rebuild that anemic 267, 307, or whatever was under the hood, instead of going for a transplant because it's worth more stock, then it has arrived. Until then, no. Prices may go up, but it won't be for collectability reasons. More of a dwindling supply with still moderately sustained demand. I might be wrong, but I never thought for a minute the G-body would ever become a collectible car in notion that people normally think about.
 

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