What did you do to your non-G body project today

Rktpwrd

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2015
3,266
113
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Well, as a follow-up to that post: the crate was actually closer to 60lbs (wife's scale), and the whole deal ended up being cost prohibitive. The rebuild was $400 and the shipping was $360 round trip. A new clutch is $750 with free shipping.

Aaaand THAT’S where they getcha!
 
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Supercharged111

Royal Smart Person
Oct 25, 2019
2,170
113
Colorado Springs, CO
Copy and paste from another forum. Video proof that I actually do race a car and not just say I race.

Finally got 3 of them uploaded. Camera ran out of juice in R2, I'd plugged the thing into the inverter after R1 but left the inverter off. Smooth. For R1, I qual'd 4th and slithered up to 2nd place. I want to thank John for his start on that one, it helped my by him and flyin Bryan. I had a bobble in T1 late in the race and John took a peek, but I held my position.


R2 had some yellow flag drama and after seeing how it went down, I would have made the same mistake. I finished 7th here, but got bumped to 4th. I think in R3 I started 8th, passed as much inverted traffic as I could, stuck to Bob's bumper for most of it, then followed an AMCM car down the inside of T10 on the last lap to snipe 2nd. John was in his own zip code at this point.


And now for the final. I came in with the pole, but screwed the pooch getting back on the gas with John in T1. He did not blow the start on this one, figures. I hounded him for a couple of laps, then missed 3rd leaving the b*tch and that was all the gap he needed to do his thing. In the yellow, there was an AI car between me and John so I never could get close enough to do anything. Not like we had much time, the checker came right out after the yellow.


First time I've been on the podium down there, it felt pretty good to do it. Hopefully nothing prevents me from coming back down next year.
 

Injectedcutty

G body LS mafia
Supporting Member
Nov 24, 2014
5,778
113
Louisville, KY
Went and helped out my uncle junk a bunch of stuff today.

Backstory: my dad's parents lived on the same property from 1940 up till 2010 when my grandma passed away. My uncle took over ownership as to make sure my aunt (his sister) had a place to stay. Needless to say there were decades of stuff in the small garage. Fast forward to last year, my aunt caught covid before my dad and it's wrecked her life forever. She was in the hospital for a few months before going to rehab. As of now she still can't eat, bathe, walk, use bathroom, speak, etc so she was moved into my cousins place.
My uncle determined she wasn't coming home again so he decided to sell the property to a friend. That's where today came in and helping empty out the garage. We tossed so much old stuff it was ridiculous as my grandpa was a pack rat lol. However, I brought this cabinet home that was my dads. It still had all kinds of glass buss fuses, points for dizzy's, carb kits, etc. Pretty cool having it here, I'll hang it on the wall and fill it with modern stuff. I grew up at my grandparents house during the summers, and always remembered the sound of this air compressor kicking on. Damn thing still works good too. I think my uncle is gonna clean it up good and put it in his new shop when done. Couple pics, it was hot and swampy here in KY today so I'm finally kicking it in the AC now.
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CopperNick

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
684
93
Canada
About those pictures i promised to upload................

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So what you are seeing is the front, back, and an overall shot of my non G-Body, G-body project, my Chev G-10 Van, as it presently sits on its stacks of cribbing. Each stack is composed of six individual sections, stacked one on top of another.


DSCN2807.JPG



To explain how the stacks are assembled, I've included this detail shot. It essentially shows how the stack is built. The two sections of vertical two by four, one at each end, have been placed as they have to act as keepers to keep the sections in vertical alignment with each other and deter them from moving, just in case.

Each layer is actually a unique structure. By that I mean they are built individually and then stacked as needed or necessary. The measurements I used are also unique to the tires that are mounted on the van, although they possess enough width that they could be used for other situations. Physically they are built from 2" x 4"'s; x 96". it took about 39 out of the 40 that I bought to get enough components of the right lengths for each batch of wood needed for an assembly. The two outer rails are each 28 inches long. The four cross ribs are each 18 inches long. When assembled two of the ribs become ends and the other two get set into place so as to be equally spaced from their respective end rib; that worked out to 12 inches outside edge to outside edge. They are screwed together using 2-1/2 inch #8 square drive (Robertson) deck screws, which come with a green coating as a rust deterrent, and yes I did use a triangle square to measure and make sure the ribs hit the rails at 90 degrees as well as checking each internal rib for location too. All this OCD was just by way of making sure that, when stacked, all the load points fell in line and the weight from the vehicle transferred down into the stack and through it down to the ground without there being any stress on the structure due to there being any aspect of it that lacked proper support. The contact patches of the tire actually sit on the inner two ribs which, as placed, only lay about 4 inches apart from each other so the stacks are located so as to centralize the tire on them as precisely as possible. The point load for each stack is only around 750-800 pounds of static weight at the most; concentrated mainly on the front two wheels.

With each corner lifted using a stack of six layers, i get about 20 inches of height plus that of the suspension. What that all works out to is that I can easily sit under the vehicle and not whack my head on the floor.

Right now, all that is left to do to remove the incumbent transmission is to unbolt the converter bolts, place the t-mission jack under the t-mission pan and jack it into position, pull the crossmember bolts out and drop it, and then undo the case to engine bolts and the transmission is free. it will be getting a safety chain wrapped around it to prevent it from trying to escape from the floor jack. if I can't get enough lift I can either pull a layer from each stack or run the engine cherry picker arm into the cabin and use slings to cradle the t-mission and lower it enough to set it on the jack. Brute is a slimy soggy filthy crud incrusted lump that is covered with ATF so this might be one of those JIT moments.

It's replacement is a 700R4 from an 85 C-10. Nice and clean and dry, new filter and gasket and Arp screws. Has even been de-nerded using various files and a sander to remove the casting flash and sharp edges.

For the wondering, yes I am taking it slow and easy on this. Just an hour or two of work per day so I don't forget anything or get antsy or tired and chew something up while trying to extract it. I am on my own here and the wrestling match may go easy or it might fight me. Won't know until it is done and the "out" is only the first half of the match. Getting the replacement in may prove to be just as easy or just as miserable. Will keep you posted.



Nick
 

CopperNick

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
684
93
Canada
You'd think so but the cost of the studs only worked out to around 160.00. I got to pick from a fresh lift and the yard guy didn't try to saddle me with total scrap and cutting ends. I knew that what I needed wasn't pristine lumber as i was going to be sectioning them down for the lengths that I needed so I could cut each stud according to what I wanted and what it had to give me and it all worked out. Storing the stacks may come to be a problem but I can always pull the screws and recycle everything so no harm, no foul.



Nick
 
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mclellan83

Royal Smart Person
Jun 27, 2017
2,292
113
Pgh, PA
After working on the Blazer most of the day Saturday I decided it was time for an oil change for the GTO, it had other ideas. After breaking my ratchet trying to get the oil plug off I tried a wrench for a while which also didn't work. For good measure I tried to see if I could get the air gun on it but no such luck, so finally I admitted defeat and took it to get dinner. If she wants to stay dirty guess that's how she will stay for a bit, I'll update the Blazer stuff in that thread so I don't bore you guys with all the teal
 

81cutlass

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 16, 2009
3,274
113
Western MN
Sand, stain, poly. Repeat.

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scoti

G-Body Guru
Supporting Member
Sep 5, 2019
630
93
Texas
We made our Model-A Texas-Tour trip w/o any major issues. My car was put on a trailer as the fresh engine (w/tapping) was a concern. So I was not only worried about it, I got extra worry because my '99 had yet to tow my trailer since I've lowered it. There was additional last minute work clearancing the fender well lips on it & not much gap between the axle tubes/bump-stops but it did decent for the trip. I definitely know the brake service needs to happen now sooner rather than later....

The '29 had a vapor lock issue within 20mins of highway time. We exited & pulled the hood off. That did the trick. Next was the crank pulley bolt. It came out after about an hour on the road. We did our best to get it back on & tight (it's a keyed pulley... The bolt loosened enough that the fan stopped spinning). The issue is accessing the nut requires a special 1.375" wrench when the motor is installed. We used a hammer & pry bar to knock it tight. 1st attempt lasted about 2miles. The 2nd attempt lasted the remainder of the trip (there & back). We'll pull the bolt & re-Loctite it now that it's back home. Other that those three roadside stops, we only stopped for re-fueling & topping off the radiators. The '31 Coupe has been driven fairly regularly since the end of last year so there were no mechanical concerns on it as long as the new 4spd was good.

Those new 4spds in the Coupe & '29 worked w/o issue.

The Cabriolet did ok for the actual tour. The only other issue encountered was a rear main that leaks more than desired. The Mitchell OD & factory 3spd is the way to go on these cars. It was pretty cool using OD in both 2nd & 3rd. Things learned: Cabriolets suck when it comes to its blind-spots. It was a PITA when backing into a spot. Convertible top fabric that's >60yrs old & been sitting idle for years (years) deteriorates rapidly when re-exposed to the world @ 65mph. The fuel smell takes some getting used to. You seem to always think there's a leak but that's apparently part of their 'charm' (I'm told).

It was a cool venture. Good times w/good people.
 

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Last edited:

motorheadmike

Geezer
Nov 18, 2009
7,064
113
Ottawa, Ontario Canada
We made our Model-A Texas-Tour trip w/o any major issues. My car was put on a trailer as the fresh engine (w/tapping) was a concern. So I was not only worried about it, I got extra worry because my '99 had yet to tow my trailer since I've lowered it. There was additional last minute work clearancing the fender well lips on it & not much gap between the axle tubes/bump-stops but it did decent for the trip. I definitely know the brake service needs to happen now sooner rather than later....

The '29 had a vapor lock issue within 20mins of highway time. We exited & pulled the hood off. That did the trick. Next was the crank pulley bolt. It came out after about an hour on the road. We did our best to get it back on & tight (it's a keyed pulley... The bolt loosened enough that the fan stopped spinning). The issue is accessing the nut requires a special 1.375" wrench when the motor is installed. We used a hammer & pry bar to knock it tight. 1st attempt lasted about 2miles. The 2nd attempt lasted the remainder of the trip (there & back). We'll pull the bolt & re-Loctite it now that it's back home. Other that those three roadside stops, we only stopped for re-fueling & topping off the radiators. The '31 Coupe has been driven fairly regularly since the end of last year so there were no mechanical concerns on it as long as the new 4spd was good.

Those new 4spds in the Coupe & '29 worked w/o issue.

The Cabriolet did ok for the actual tour. The only other issue encountered was a rear main that leaks more than desired. The Mitchell OD & factory 3spd is the way to go on these cars. It was pretty cool using OD in both 2nd & 3rd. Things learned: Cabriolets suck when it comes to its blind-spots. It was a PITA when backing into a spot. Convertible top fabric that's >60yrs old & been sitting idle for years (years) deteriorates rapidly when re-exposed to the world @ 65mph. The fuel smell takes some getting used to. You seem to always think there's a leak but that's apparently part of their 'charm' (I'm told).

It was a cool venture. Good times w/good people.

It's takes some balls and talent to drive those cars, much less maintain them. Impressive.
 

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