What did you do to your shop today?

Tony1968

Royal Smart Person
Jul 1, 2018
1,756
113
NW Indiana
Started to give it the Amish treatment by cutting the house to garage line & pulled the 1940's(?) fuse boxes. It's amazing how all that wiring didn't burn down either the house or garage. The one splice at the house was between old outdoor 12/2 w/o the bare copper ground to random 12awg wire was done with ground clamps & another in the middle was just bare twists with no covering.
I remember doing electrical work on many houses that were built in early 1900's. Some 1890's.
Knob and tube was what was used back then. Many still had gas lighting. I remember disconnecting a 3/8" black pipe cap that still was tied into natural gas. Yikes
 
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motorheadmike

Geezer
Nov 18, 2009
8,742
113
Saskatchewan, Truckistan
Graded and covered the area in front of the shop that keeps taking on water when it's raining. This was a muddy mess and it was getting tracked into my office/the shop. I even had to reopen one of the irrigation ditches during the last rain fall. Supposed to get an healthy dose more this week.

PXL_20220521_200101734.jpg


Then I made an apron at the bottom of the main driveway. This is because it keeps turning to mud, and getting tracked up the driveway, into the garage and into the house. I spent a good hour washing the pad and mopping out the stalls yesterday morning after washing Natasha's Z28. You can see the tracks she left when she drove back through the mud before I was finished. Grrrr...

PXL_20220521_201151244.jpg


Both of these were done with a pile of rocks left behind by the previous owners. I am going to get an order in for more... because this is unacceptable. From my research I need to make the depth 2" for a meaningful impact.

The property is looking pretty lush these days.
 
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pagrunt

Geezer
Sep 14, 2014
7,531
113
Elderton, Pa
I remember doing electrical work on many houses that were built in early 1900's. Some 1890's.
Knob and tube was what was used back then. Many still had gas lighting. I remember disconnecting a 3/8" black pipe cap that still was tied into natural gas. Yikes
This place was built in the'50's with alot of recycled materials. I'm lucky no knob & tube but there was some tar paper/coated paper/rubber insulated wire used for the long defunctional exhaust fan that ran on 220. There is alot of coated fabric/plastic wire in the mix. Not looking forward to the cost of rewiring the garage so it's functional again.
 
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pagrunt

Geezer
Sep 14, 2014
7,531
113
Elderton, Pa
Graded and covered the area in front of the shop that keeps taking on water when it's raining. This was a muddy mess and it was getting tracked into my office/the shop. I even had to reopen one of the irrigation ditches during the last rain fall. Supposed to get an healthy dose more this week.

View attachment 199066

Then I made an apron at the bottom of the main driveway. This is because it keeps turning to mud, and getting tracked up the driveway, into the garage and into the house. I spent a good hour washing the pad and mopping out the stalls yesterday morning after washing Natasha's Z28. You can see the tracks she left when she drove back through the mud before I was finished. Grrrr...

View attachment 199067

Both of these were done with a pile of rocks left behind by the previous owners. I am going to get an order in for more... because this is unacceptable. From my research I need to make the depth 2" for a meaningful impact.

The property is looking pretty lush these days.
Looks like some oil & chips might make life cleaner with that driveway. I'd suggets paving but the cost might stop that idea.
 
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Supercharged111

Comic Book Super Hero
Oct 25, 2019
3,178
113
Colorado Springs, CO
Graded and covered the area in front of the shop that keeps taking on water when it's raining. This was a muddy mess and it was getting tracked into my office/the shop. I even had to reopen one of the irrigation ditches during the last rain fall. Supposed to get an healthy dose more this week.

View attachment 199066

Then I made an apron at the bottom of the main driveway. This is because it keeps turning to mud, and getting tracked up the driveway, into the garage and into the house. I spent a good hour washing the pad and mopping out the stalls yesterday morning after washing Natasha's Z28. You can see the tracks she left when she drove back through the mud before I was finished. Grrrr...

View attachment 199067

Both of these were done with a pile of rocks left behind by the previous owners. I am going to get an order in for more... because this is unacceptable. From my research I need to make the depth 2" for a meaningful impact.

The property is looking pretty lush these days.

What kind of rock is that? Crushed limestone, AKA poor man's cement, needs to be 4" thick.
 

motorheadmike

Geezer
Nov 18, 2009
8,742
113
Saskatchewan, Truckistan
What kind of rock is that? Crushed limestone, AKA poor man's cement, needs to be 4" thick.

Free?

I don't really know.

It's a crushed blue grey rock. I just threw it down as a temporary fix. I am going to get a bunch of (12?) yards of 3/4" river rock and see what that nets me.
 

ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
3,900
113
I put a 2" surface on a 250 ft gravel drive using (2) slightly overloaded 27 cu yd tandem dump loads. Was probably closer to 29 yd per load the way they had it. That was spread to an 8-9 ft width. Admittedly, some spots got filled a bit deeper to even ruts, and come areas on the edge of corners were built up as much as 6 inches.
 

86LK

G-Body Guru
Jul 23, 2018
643
93
you might want to take a look at crushed granite and see if that works out for you
 

CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
1,739
113
Canada
Added to the dust and debris already haunting the floor by fabricating and installing a small section of sheet metal into the inner door shell to replace a piece that used to act as a doubler/re-inforcer and which got cut away or ripped out at some point in the life of the door.

Finished with that and then took a broom to the floor and swept up all the dust and debris and turned it all into a nice neat little pile that will find its way to the dust bin in due course.

May generate just enough personal energy tomorrow to fire up the vacuum and poke around under the various lumps and clumps to dig out some of the accumulated debris that is presently trying to hide.



On the matter of crushed rock, around here one of local construction companies has its own quarry and mills stone to size according to what is needed as backfill or other media for the various contracts. The crushing process creates a by-product locally called "crusher fines"; basically rock chips of various sizes. The stuff can be bought by the truck load or by 5 gallon pails if you bring your own pails. I've used it as substrate for patio pads and the Quarter Deck (so called because it is about a quarter of the size of a normal ground level patio deck) that I created in front of my lawn entrance to my shop got maybe a half dozen pails as foundation material. Even with all the frost and cold this past winter, the concrete pads remained pretty much as set. All I had to do this spring was add more fines into the seams between the stones as it all had settled over the winter.

As a sub layer or space filler, the stuff should work fairly well. it is easy to move around and can be shoveled or hand bombed.



Nick
 
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WanaBa442

Master Mechanic
Aug 5, 2017
472
93
New England
Added to the dust and debris already haunting the floor by fabricating and installing a small section of sheet metal into the inner door shell to replace a piece that used to act as a doubler/re-inforcer and which got cut away or ripped out at some point in the life of the door.

Finished with that and then took a broom to the floor and swept up all the dust and debris and turned it all into a nice neat little pile that will find its way to the dust bin in due course.

May generate just enough personal energy tomorrow to fire up the vacuum and poke around under the various lumps and clumps to dig out some of the accumulated debris that is presently trying to hide.



On the matter of crushed rock, around here one of local construction companies has its own quarry and mills stone to size according to what is needed as backfill or other media for the various contracts. The crushing process creates a by-product locally called "crusher fines"; basically rock chips of various sizes. The stuff can be bought by the truck load or by 5 gallon pails if you bring your own pails. I've used it as substrate for patio pads and the Quarter Deck (so called because it is about a quarter of the size of a normal ground level patio deck) that I created in front of my lawn entrance to my shop got maybe a half dozen pails as foundation material. Even with all the frost and cold this past winter, the concrete pads remained pretty much as set. All I had to do this spring was add more fines into the seams between the stones as it all had settled over the winter.

As a sub layer or space filler, the stuff should work fairly well. it is easy to move around and can be shoveled or hand bombed.



Nick

This is what you use for a driveway here in New England.
River rock will never stay put, one hit with the plow next winter and you'll have piles of it everywhere! Too smooth, won't pack.
Crusher fines are known locally here as "Sure-pack".
Doesn't really build up well because it's "fine" but packs like concrete and once settled in really doesn't follow you into the house.
 
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