442 1985 442 Carburetor Stock Restoration-Refurbish

69hurstolds

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Jan 2, 2006
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Here's pics of the final product. Now I'm going to bag it, tag it, and put it in a box until it's needed.

17085554 reassemble 111.JPG

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17085554 reassemble 113.JPG

17085554 reassemble 115.JPG

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17085554 reassemble 118.JPG

17085554 reassemble 120.JPG
 
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Rktpwrd

Builder of Cool Shjt
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Feb 2, 2015
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Excellent and very detailed write up Mike, and a beautiful job too. Thank you for sharing this with the forum, as usual your contributions are invaluable. I commend you sir!
 
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69hurstolds

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Excellent and very detailed write up Mike, and a beautiful job too. Thank you for sharing this with the forum, as usual your contributions are invaluable. I commend you sir!
Thank you! I just hope someone saves their E-jet because this thread helped them fix it instead of listening to those that don't understand this type of carb.
 
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87 Monte Carlo SS

Not-quite-so-new-guy
May 30, 2022
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Thank you so much for all your time that you put into this write up and all the adjustments.
This will be very helpful for when I rebuild my carb.
Rick
 
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84 W40

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Dec 9, 2009
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You did an excellent job rebuilding that carburetor. What I like about it more is the detailed pictures and you explaining how each part goes together and there function.
 
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69hurstolds

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Jan 2, 2006
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You did an excellent job rebuilding that carburetor. What I like about it more is the detailed pictures and you explaining how each part goes together and there function.
Thanks for the support. Either fortunate or unfortunate, this type of carburetor doesn't lend itself to lots of mods and still being able to play well with the CCC system. It's a LEAN azz carburetor from the factory and emissions is the concern. Even though there are some sections of it, like the secondary circuit, that the ECM doesn't even look at, the cruising and start up can be a real PITA if things aren't set to specs. I've learned a ton more every time I do one of these carbs. Maybe one day I'll figure out how to actually live with the CCC and still set it up for better performance without regards to being super-lean but still be emission friendly. Or maybe not.

Thank you so much for all your time that you put into this write up and all the adjustments.
This will be very helpful for when I rebuild my carb.
Rick
Thanks for reading it. Your (I'm assuming) Monte has the 4ME with electric choke and has a few different spec settings, but for the most part it will follow much of the same setup as this one.
 
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87 Monte Carlo SS

Not-quite-so-new-guy
May 30, 2022
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Yes you are correct mine is the 4ME with electric coke. So will all the other adjustment be right on mine except for the choke.
I have rebuilt carbs before in the 70's but never an electric carb. They scare me.
From reading your post you must be a Master mechanic or a Parts manager.
You sure know your stuff.
 

69hurstolds

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Jan 2, 2006
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Yes you are correct mine is the 4ME with electric coke. So will all the other adjustment be right on mine except for the choke.
I have rebuilt carbs before in the 70's but never an electric carb. They scare me.
From reading your post you must be a Master mechanic or a Parts manager.
You sure know your stuff.
Well, thanks, I guess. I still have a lot to learn. Hopefully looking at this thread shows you that if you can rebuild a regular non-computer Quadrajet, you can do 90% of a CCC E-jet.

You would need to know your carburetor number and get the specs for all the bench settings for your particular carb and application. It may be either 17087130 1st design, or 17087306 2nd design. Or could be 17087129. I don't know. Not familiar enough with them. Some settings may be the same as my carb, but some may be a bit different. Like most Chevies secondary air valve wraps show 7/8 of a turn clockwise past seated, where the Olds is 1/2 turn.

EDIT. Ah, the Monte SS has the "G" 305, thus it should be a 17087129 carb number. I have some specs for that, but not all.

Set your lean stop to 1.304" with the gage like in the writeup here. Same with the Rich stop to 4/32" total paddle travel and IABV set with the tool.
Float setting is 11/32"
Fast idle Cam Choke Rod choke plate angle is 20 degrees
Primary vacuum break is 27 degrees, same as my Olds VIN 9 one.
Secondary air valve wrap is 7/8 turn clockwise past seated.
Unloader setting is 38 degrees.
The secondary air valve link from the primary choke pulloff is still likely to be 0.025" gap as it is here.
Mixture screws probably can benefit from being set at 3 turns open from seated as it is here, but I don't have exact specs for this carb.

This is why it always helps to have a service manual for your particular model. As far as the Primary Jet MC Solenoid position, the J-33815 tool (1.304") for the lean stop is correct as well as the 4/32" total paddle travel. The bench setting for the IABV is set the same with the shepard hook tool as well. If you have trouble finding your specs, hit me up and we can get you going in the right direction. I don't have any Monte Carlo CSM's, but someone here probably does. Oh, and IIRC, Monte Carlo carbs don't even have a Rear Vacuum Break. I could be wrong on that, though.

Never worked at a GM dealership. I've always been on the customer side of the counter at the parts department a whole bunch, though. But with nearly 40 years of jacking around with G-bodies, you kind of get to know them a little. Especially Oldsmobile G-bodies, and more specifically the H/O and 442.
 
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Kra5379

Apprentice
Apr 30, 2019
94
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I did this on the Frankencarb, and took the pics, so this is more for procedure. You do not have to do this part if you don't want to take the time to do it. Theoretically, you just bolt it on and crank it up, then set it per specs when it goes into closed loop. But in case you see some problems on the bench, it's better to fix it now before it lands on the car. Just one less PITA thing. If you're pressed for time, just do it on the car.

What we're trying to accomplish here is to simply get in the ballpark for TPS setting on the bench so that you are "close" when you crank up the car. You still may get a code for high or low TPS voltage while doing it on the car. That's ok, you'll clear all codes anyway once you're done adjusting. This will simply speed up the TPS adjustment on the car. Plus, it's exactly what you'd be doing on the car anyway, so you can get a bit of practice in on it before you actually do it.

Recall you did NOT install the TPS cover plug (along with the Lean and Rich stop plugs) as you want to ensure adjustability during closed loop operation. You'll install the plugs later after you get the stops where you want them and the TPS fully adjusted.

Using a 5.0 volt DC power supply, I rigged up power to the TPS reference signal. I realize this will not be the exact voltage you'll see on the car, but it will still be pretty close. If I had one of those whamodyne adjustable power supplies, I could dial in exactly what I need, but you will STILL need to check it on the car anyway. I wouldn't use it enough to justify the expediture to get one. I already had the 5V DC power supply, so I'm using it.

Starting at the top, recall you have an A, B and C connection points as you go down the connector. A is the 5V DC in reference signal from the ECM. B is the variable signal return BACK to the ECM. And C is the common, or ground. Hook up the voltmeter to check the voltage going in and you can see it's a tad higher than 5V. It's very likely and not unusual that you may see slightly less than 5V on the car. Which is ok, the point is the ECM will see a differential voltage and calculate the throttle "position" from this. It is extremely important that you get the TPS position set as close as you can to 0.41V at 550 RPM in drive. It's not going to kill anything if you're at 0.40 or 0.42, but if you can get it set at 0.41, that's as good as you can get.

You can see the reference voltage here at 5.14V DC. A tad higher than what you'd see on the car's actual ECM reference voltage for the most part, but that's ok. We're just ballparking it here on the "bench".
View attachment 202734

And now you can adjust your curb idle screw to 550 simulated rpm (just a wild guess on the curb idle), and ensure the choke isn't engaged and you're off the fast idle steps. Adjust the TPS adjusting screw with a suitable tool as you can see in the picture to get your output reading at terminal B (middle terminal) to 0.41V DC and you're golden. It's pretty sensitive trying to get 1/100ths of a volt, so take your time and do it slow. Once adjusted, let it settle out. Crack the throttle open and return it and see if it returns to 0.41V. Don't worry about a couple hundredths of a volt, but you don't want it going all wild on you and throwing codes.
View attachment 202735

And with that, we are DONE DONE with this carburetor! Now it's ready to bolt on and do the operational setup on the car. A few tweaks and it should run like a new one again!
Good luck everyone. I hope this little rebuild thread can help you out.

EDIT: Just wanted to add that I edited post #15 to add the ohm check across the body and terminals for the MC Solenoid. I meant to show that, but forgot. So I went back and added it. Super simple check, but hard to do once you put the carb back together.
Just a quick note on the desktop power supplies, while simply using it to provide power to the TPS reference signal isn’t enough to justify buying one, they are great at “reviving” dead automotive batteries….if you have a couple weeks/months to keep cycling it (charge/discharge rinse/repeat)
 

Kra5379

Apprentice
Apr 30, 2019
94
74
18
Yes you are correct mine is the 4ME with electric coke. So will all the other adjustment be right on mine except for the choke.
I have rebuilt carbs before in the 70's but never an electric carb. They scare me.
From reading your post you must be a Master mechanic or a Parts manager.
You sure know your stuff.
Do you happen to have a list of the different setting specifications for the TPS voltage on different models? I can’t find it anywhere for my 1983 E2ME that’s on a Buick 231 that came from the factory in my 1983 Cutlass Supreme Brougham. I’ve bought 3 different brand rebuild kits in the last year, and it’s not on any of the sheets
 

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