Just dropped the headliner- YUCK!

CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
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Feb 20, 2018
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Canada
Denatured alcohol is at least 98% pure alky. Acetone is brutal; the stuff evaporates about as fast as it leaves the containter.



Nick
 

ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
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Denatured alcohol is at least 98% pure alky. Acetone is brutal; the stuff evaporates about as fast as it leaves the containter.



Nick
Have to be careful.... denatured alcohol can range between 70% to 99% alcohol and still be sold on the shelf the same. At 99%, not bad. At 70%, that's where questions arise
 

Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
Nick the gaffers tape I saw had a waterproof backing so that is out. Ever see a sound stage or theater where all the wires and things are taped to the floor? That is gaffers tape. CK80 I have a gallon can of Evercoat Marine Resin that it says is thick for boat use. It is very thick and hard to brush out but that was OK for the patches. I will try the Acetone/Lacquer Thinner as that is what I have on hand. I usually use that to clean up with and the can says to use that too. No mention of thinning since it is meant to be thicker than usual. I am thinking the solvent will vaporize fast and then the resin can cure normally. I may have to take it all outside as those vapors are probably explosive. A hot attic is no place for Acetone or Lacquer Thinner vapors. Also I was saving a gallon can of automotive grade resin that had a plastic cover with two tubes of hardener inside. Well, the hardener leaked, ate through the top of the steel can, and hardened the whole gallon right in the can. Amazing.
 
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ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
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Nick the gaffers tape I saw had a waterproof backing so that is out. Ever see a sound stage or theater where all the wires and things are taped to the floor? That is gaffers tape. CK80 I have a gallon can of Evercoat Marine Resin that it says is thick for boat use. It is very thick and hard to brush out but that was OK for the patches. I will try the Acetone/Lacquer Thinner as that is what I have on hand. I usually use that to clean up with and the can says to use that too. No mention of thinning since it is meant to be thicker than usual. I am thinking the solvent will vaporize fast and then the resin can cure normally. I may have to take it all outside as those vapors are probably explosive. A hot attic is no place for Acetone or Lacquer Thinner vapors. Also I was saving a gallon can of automotive grade resin that had a plastic cover with two tubes of hardener inside. Well, the hardener leaked, ate through the top of the steel can, and hardened the whole gallon right in the can. Amazing.
I vaguely remember the marine grade stuff from replacing the whole floor decking in a 1960s starcraft deep v runabout. I was almost like pour it from the can, push it around a little where you wanted, and it was done.

Gaffers stuff I had was both old, and water resistant. For the small spots I put it about 1/2" wide at the tile it was find to be embedded into the resin. All depends what you use, how you use, and especially how badly the board is busted up.

Pretty crazy what happened with the auto grade stuff. Never heard of anything like that. How long had it sat around to eat through like that?
 

Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
LONG time. I think I grabbed it cheaply at a swap meet and forgot about it. But I am used to the hardener eating the plastic tubes it comes in. I only use fresh hardener now.
 

Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
So I dragged the headliner boards and the sheet of plywood down from the attic out to the driveway. Sitting in the hot July Sun was bad so I decided to thin the resin with lacquer thinner. I kept adding small amounts until it thinned out nicely. At first it would not mix but then you felt the resin loosen up and relax. I still reduced the hardener down to 1/3 the recommended amount because of the ambient 85° heat. That worked out OK and it was pretty brush-able. One coat covered pretty good too. Once totally hard I will try for a second coat. The thinning definitely extended the cure time which is a good thing. I even held the cup of resin in the shade of my body just to keep the Sun from kicking it off too fast. IMG_0438.JPG
 
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Bonnewagon

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Sep 18, 2009
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CK80- you were right, the second coat went on much easier and covered better. It took 16oz of resin to do a complete second coat on both boards. It has a nice smooth finish now. I will stash it in the garage to wait for better weather to try and do the cloth. MAN it is hot this year.
 
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Longroof79

Rocket Powered Basset Hound
Oct 14, 2008
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Gainesville, Fl
It looks good, Mark.
Looks like you're ready to rock n' roll. Was your rear headliner board in better shape? I found that was the case when doing mine.
 
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ck80

Comic Book Super Hero
Feb 18, 2014
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CK80- you were right, the second coat went on much easier and covered better. It took 16oz of resin to do a complete second coat on both boards. It has a nice smooth finish now. I will stash it in the garage to wait for better weather to try and do the cloth. MAN it is hot this year.
This foam backed stuff is a LOT less forgiving when laying it down than most other fabric types ive glued. One guy can do it, I have, but it's easier with two.

Because the board has curves, I've found it helpful to use a sewing tape measure to measure against the surface tonfind the widest surface length, then start from the middle there instead of an edge.

Sometimes, on some roofs, if you start at a front corner and are going on in a straight line, you get partway through and say what the heck happened when your fabric no longer meets the side or there isn't enough left to wrap over onto the back to glue down.

So. After measuring, I lay a sharpie line from the center of the widest point, to the center of the front and the center of the back. Then, I like to roll both ends up, like a rolled up medieval scroll, with the middle of the fabric as the dividing point.

I line up my fabric center with my backer board true center, then apply glue as I work outwards from center towards one side edge, finish, wrap the excess over the board edge 1-2", then clamp. Potato chip bag clips holding down paint stirrers or free yardsticks if you can get them reduces crushes on the edge, even though trim usually covers it anyways.

Same deal, tiny binder clip/chip bag clip keeps the other half of fabric rolled up while not working with it. Then, once both left and right sides of boards are don't, includingnwrapping to back and trimming excess, I finish off the front and rear.

The reason I work left and right, and, not front to back, is I find the board has sharper curvature to the sides of roof to center. It's easier to smooth that tight without wrinkles going that direction. Just my experience, your mileage may vary.
 

Bonnewagon

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Thread starter
Sep 18, 2009
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Queens, NY
Yes Jack. The rear part was way better. But still some damage from 39 years of abuse. We are having one of those hot and humid NY Summers again. YUCK!
 
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