What did you do to your shop today?

Hurricane77

Apprentice
Nov 11, 2020
58
33
Ottawa, Canada
It's been a couple weeks and have been making progress on the shop build. Took a week off last week to get at it. Even had a friend take off the week as well to give me a hand. Unfortunately there have been several issues with the building manufacturer. Pieces missing, pieces mislabeled, pieces made incorrectly. It's just bee really frustrating. Kind of makes me wonder why I didn't go with stick built, but anyway.

Last update I had a few of the column set. Next bit, and probably the most dangerous part was raising the rafters. I'm a cheap b*st*rd and really didn't want to pay a couple grand for a telehandler rental. Most of the pieces aren't too heavy individually. The heaviest assemblies were about 400-450lbs. We used the same contraption I built to lift the column for the rafters. Started by lifting one end of the rafter up and putting a single bolt in connecting it to the column


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The readjust the crane to the other end to lift the center part of the rafter. Holding it in place we then put the remaining bolt in connecting it to the column, and put a wood support under it to stabilize it.

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Repeat the process for the opposite side, align the two rafters and bolt them up at the peak. The crane contraption was a bit too short in the end and I ended up having to extend it by several feet. In the below photo, we had a bit of a gap between the two rafter and used some ratchet straps to pull stuff into place.

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And more of the same for the next set of columns. In this picture, you can see the cables braces between the middle two columns. These cables ended up being one of the huge pains. They have threaded eye bolts on each side so you can tension them to stiffen up the center bay. Everything else kind of keys off of that. Problem way, the cable were just barely long enough to install. You can install them one of two ways. Put the girt (horizontal piece) in first, and then install the cables. Problem with this method, is with how short the cables are, you needed to use herculean effort to get the eye bolt through the column far enough to get the washer and nut on. Or, you install the cable first, and then put the girt in. Same issue except now you're having to pry the columns apart to get the girts in. We double checked all the measurements, anchor bolts were in the right place, column were plumb and it was just a huge amount of effort to get the part assembled. And extra inch in the length of those cable would have made all the difference.

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Go the two center rafters up and bolted together. Next is to install the purlins. Here you can see we have cables braces in the ceiling as well. In the roof, there are two sets (two Xs) on each side of the rafters. The problem with the cables wasn't consistent. You can see the sets of cables near the peak are quite loose. But you can see how tight the cables sets closer to the outside are. Those are already installed with as little thread engagement as possible, they cannot be made looser. You can see the strap running from the rafter down to the tractor. We're trying to separate the rafters far enough to get the bolts for the purlins in but fighting against the tension of the cables.

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After fighting with the one side so much, we ended up wedging in some sistered 2x6s to spread the rafter enough so that we weren't fighting to put every single purlin in. We only had this problem on the center section as it's the only part that has the cable braces.

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From there, it's a bit of a repeat for the front section. Lift rafters, bolt it up, put in purlins. Here we ran into another issue. A girt the spans from the front column to the adjacent one was missing from the shipment. It didn't really delay us too badly. We temporarily braced that column, got the rafters in place and were able to install the purlins which stabilized that front bay enough.

Front and back walls were then put in. The back wall is a bit lighter construction than the middle part. There's no openings, and it doesn't have to support as much weight as one of the middle parts does, so it was quite a bit easier to put in. Still had to use my 'crane' to put in the rafters, but most of it bolted together quite easily. Front wall was dead simple, all those pieces were able to be put in by hand. Looking at is from the front, there's going to be one single overhead on the left, a double overhead door in the middle and then a man on on the right. The jambs for the small overhead door are now installed too as is one of the jambs for the man door. Just waiting on to get the man door itself before I install the second jamb so I'm sure to get the rough opening size right. The below is the 'mostly completed structure.

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At that point I was still missing the girt and when installing the back purlins, we were missing three pieces of angle bracket to connect them to the rafter. There's 5 purlins on per section on each side of the peak, so I should have had 10 brackets, 5 of each and then do have different part number in the BOM. Except they only sent me 7. And all 7 were for the same side. I ended up having to mirror and drill new holes in order to install 2 of them on one side. You can see here what I mean. The left bracket is fine. The right brackets you can see have extra holes in them now. Since I was already waiting on the missing girt, I figured I'd get them to send the remaining angle brackets as well rather than just going to local metal supplier and getting the appropriate angle iron.

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I figured that since they had different part numbers, whoever made them just made a simple mistake when drilling them and no big deal. Didn't feel that I had to mention to the supplier that their parts were wrong. when I finally did receive the girt and the brackets yesterday, low and behold, the replacement were also wrong. Here's me holding up one of the replacements to show the supplier the issue. anyway, I ended up redrilling those too and finally got the remaining purlins and the missing girt installed. so at this point, the frame is complete.

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While I was waiting for the missing pieces, I was able to work on getting some of the insulation and siding up. These are R-20, 6" rolls of faced insulation that basically get sandwiched in between the frame and the siding. The 6" is a bit of a pain, because you do have to compress it quite a bit to get the panels screwed in. We did go through a bit of a learning curve in making sure the panels don't sag and end up being misaligned, but we ended up getting it figured out. by thursday last week we were able to get about 2/3rd of one wall done.

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Over the course of the weekend, I lost my helper, but still managed to complete the remainder of the left wall and 2/3rds of the right wall by myself. I had to stop on the right wall because of the missing girt, but now that it's in place I can finish that up.

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the above is as it stand now. Frame complete. Left wall, 2/3rds of right wall and one panel of the front wall installed. Unfortunately I'm back at work now so progress will slow and there's not much daylight in the evenings. It's dark by 7 pm. Though I'll probably break out the flood lights. This week kind of suck weather-wise too. Its fairly rainy, which kind of prevent one form doing insulation work. But I'd really like to push through so I can get the roof on and get it mostly protected from the elements. But there's a fair bit of trim work too that has to be in place before the roof goes on. And it seems like I'm only going to get my garage doors by the end of December. but can still probably start getting some stuff moved in there before then and figure out some sort of temporary door situation.
 
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CopperNick

Royal Smart Person
Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
1,093
113
Canada
Today became a cleaning day as tomorrow is already claimed by a call in. Once I had finished applying a good coat of POR 15 to the pass side frame rail I elected to just clean up and call things a wrap. Did the heavy cleaning yesterday with the vacuum but there was still a lot of debris that had found its way into various corners and behind things. Didn't want to raise any dust so out came the small broom and off I went.

Took the opportunity to take the old door skin, take a file to the edges, and stack it off in a corner for future consideration/practice. Opened a path from the main door to the welding bench and moved the inner door assembly up and into position so I can revisit and repair some of the adhoc work that I had done so long ago.

Still have the driver's side to chip and strip but it may be easier with less decay to deal with, haven't surveyed it yet.

For the curious, the pattern here is chip and strip, wire wheel the exposed surfaces to remove loose material, rechip/strip as necessary, vacuum the debris, roll on a coat of RustMort, let dry, roll/brush on a coat of POR 15, let dry, then top coat with the double coating of black that I have used for the floor pan of the Monte.

Just a lot of manual labor and slow going. Have to limit the time per day to protect my lungs; even with a full dust mask and face protection the dust is invasive. Already wore out one bunny suit. Note for anyone considering POR 15 for rust work. it is an encapsulator, not a killer. It works by isolating the rust from air; no oxygen, no oxidation. That said, it can be injured or damaged by exposure to UV or impact from road debris or salt. Thus, the top coats of paint get applied to act as insulation.

Oh, yeah, couple of minor items. The material from which a bunny suit is made, sort of a tyvek or typar product, is semi-porous and wil absorb Por 15 if some drops on it. This means you need to have a long sleeved shirt or sweat shirt on underneath that you are willing to get permanently stained. Por 15 has its own thinner but that is no guaranteee that the product can be leached out of clothes.

Also, once it gets on anything and dries, it is basically permanent. Get it on tools or clothes or surfaces and it had better get wiped off RFN. Any chance to cure or harden and there it will stay. This is particularly true of Human Skin! It won't wash off. It can be peeled off, or ground off, or sanded off, or shaved off if it is in hair but otherwise the only thing that will remove it is time and the natural cycle of skin growth and shedding. The one and only time I had to self-remove it, I was able to peel/shave it off but did discover that my skin was not happy afterwards.

So.


Nick



Nick
 

Rktpwrd

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2015
3,443
113
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Finally in the death throes of cleaning in The Skunkworks. Last coats of polish are going on the bench side of the floor tonight, then it’s finished for good.
Here’s the opposite side after 3 coats of polish and before all the equipment went back:

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Speaking of the equipment, EVERYTHING got a thorough cleaning and scrub down. My little Miller welder practically looks like new again! Same with the bandsaw, the engine hoist, the hydraulic pipe bender and the bead roller.

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Spent a little bit of dough too, I want every piece of equipment on this wall to be useable with as little fuss as possible. That means making them mobile. The Shop Vac, the welder and the bandsaw all already rolled, but the rest didn’t.

Picked up 2 more universal mobile equipment bases, and put them underneath the bead roller and the pipe bender.

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The pipe bender proved to be an additional challenge due to the round base on it. Since the mobile bases only have support in the corners, this wasn’t going to work with the round base. Some 3/16” plate and a tidy sum of $100 + tax later, I had a nice sturdy bottom to put inside the mobile base for the bender to sit on.

Also revamped the condensate drains situation on the compressed air system with a little larger bucket and the lines entering from the sides. This will reduce the “splash back” when the automatic tank drain goes off and the air pushes the oily condensate around. (Had to clean that ugly yellow oily mess off the wall and floor too).

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Beyond that, it’s just been cleaning, cleaning, and more cleaning. I’ve cleaned everything from the posters on the walls, to the air hoses, fire extinguishers, even the garbage cans. Still have a bit more cleaning to do yet, and a service on the compressor, but I figure by the end of the weekend, I should be completely finished and ready to start looking at The Juggernaut in earnest.
 
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64nailhead

Goat Herder
Supporting Member
Dec 1, 2014
3,612
113
Upstate NY
Finally in the death throes of cleaning in The Skunkworks. Last coats of polish are going on the bench side of the floor tonight, then it’s finished for good.
Here’s the opposite side after 3 coats of polish and before all the equipment went back:

View attachment 185459

Speaking of the equipment, EVERYTHING got a thorough cleaning and scrub down. My little Miller welder practically looks like new again! Same with the bandsaw, the engine hoist, the hydraulic pipe bender and the bead roller.

View attachment 185460

View attachment 185461

View attachment 185462

Spent a little bit of dough too, I want every piece of equipment on this wall to be useable with as little fuss as possible. That means making them mobile. The Shop Vac, the welder and the bandsaw all already rolled, but the rest didn’t.

Picked up 2 more universal mobile equipment bases, and put them underneath the bead roller and the pipe bender.

View attachment 185463

View attachment 185465

The pipe bender proved to be an additional challenge due to the round base on it. Since the mobile bases only have support in the corners, this wasn’t going to work with the round base. Some 3/16” plate and a tidy sum of $100 + tax later, I had a nice sturdy bottom to put inside the mobile base for the bender to sit on.

Also revamped the condensate drains situation on the compressed air system with a little larger bucket and the lines entering from the sides. This will reduce the “splash back” when the automatic tank drain goes off and the air pushes the oily condensate around. (Had to clean that ugly yellow oily mess off the wall and floor too).

View attachment 185464

Beyond that, it’s just been cleaning, cleaning, and more cleaning. I’ve cleaned everything from the posters on the walls, to the air hoses, fire extinguishers, even the garbage cans. Still have a bit more cleaning to do yet, and a service on the compressor, but I figure by the end of the weekend, I should be completely finished and ready to start looking at The Juggernaut in earnest.
D,
How well does the vertical tubing bender work? And how large of a pipe will it bend?
 
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Rktpwrd

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2015
3,443
113
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
D,
How well does the vertical tubing bender work? And how large of a pipe will it bend?

I haven’t got to use it yet, I got it from my coworker last year for free. But apparently it works great. He said he used it to build a ton of roundy-round race car cages. Naturally being the tool wh*re that I am, I could see the possibilities with the addition of it to my shop. Chassis support bars, cage bars, and exhaust tubing all immediately come to mind.

The dies range from 1/2” to 2”, here’s a link to the current comparable bender as mine:

 
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64nailhead

Goat Herder
Supporting Member
Dec 1, 2014
3,612
113
Upstate NY
I haven’t got to use it yet, I got it from my coworker last year for free. But apparently it works great. He said he used it to build a ton of roundy-round race car cages. Naturally being the tool wh*re that I am, I could see the possibilities with the addition of it to my shop. Chassis support bars, cage bars, and exhaust tubing all immediately come to mind.

The dies range from 1/2” to 2”, here’s a link to the current comparable bender as this mine:

Well dang, that's a bunch cheaper than I would've thought.

I was asking because of the self containment/small footprint of it. I've not been around a manual one that isn't a giant morphydite that is floor mounted. My garage/shop could handle the unit you have. Ya know, always battling the issue of where to store it?
 
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Rktpwrd

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2015
3,443
113
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Well dang, that's a bunch cheaper than I would've thought.

I was asking because of the self containment/small footprint of it. I've not been around a manual one that isn't a giant morphydite that is floor mounted. My garage/shop could handle the unit you have. Ya know, always battling the issue of where to store it?
Yep, exactly. The small footprint is nice, but this thing is still a beast. It weighs a ton. That’s why I wanted the mobile bases under it and everything else, it can be stored off to the side the majority of the time when not in use, but easily wheeled out front and center when needed.
I’ve seen the ones you’ve referring to, and yeah. They can be large, unwieldy and cumbersome to say the least.
 

Hurricane77

Apprentice
Nov 11, 2020
58
33
Ottawa, Canada
Well dang, that's a bunch cheaper than I would've thought.

I was asking because of the self containment/small footprint of it. I've not been around a manual one that isn't a giant morphydite that is floor mounted. My garage/shop could handle the unit you have. Ya know, always battling the issue of where to store it?

Well, there are differences between a pipe bender and a tubing bender. Generally people recommend against using one of those pipe bender for tube. The dies don't fit right and they tend to kink and distort the radius more than a tube bender with a follower die. That being said, there's a bunch of people who use them for tube and have several tips and tricks to improve the quality of the bends. If you're going to build stuff out of pipe, should be okay. Depends on what you're doing. If you're making cages, some sanctioning bodies won't accept pipe. Though whoever Rkt bought it from obviously made it work. And if you want, there's endless threads out there, especially in the offroad forums, on what you should be using (pipe vs. tube)

I have a JDSquared Model 3, that is manual that I set up vertically and attaches to my engine stand. Works okay for individual projects etc. But if you want it oriented horizontally, yeah it pretty much needs to be bolted to the floor. Or setup with hydraulics. Swag Offroad makes a pretty neat kit to convert the JdSquared that I have to an air over hydraulic setup.
 
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Rktpwrd

Comic Book Super Hero
Supporting Member
Feb 2, 2015
3,443
113
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Mobile universal bases? I need some of those! Where can I find them?
Just about anywhere really. Amazon, Home Dopey, probably Lowes and likely Harbour Fright. I’m in Canada, so I got mine locally from one of the tool stores around here.
 
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